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Five possible solutions the GAA can use to solve the hurling penalty debacle

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None of the last seven penalties in this year's Championship have found the net while the last three, including John O'Dwyer's for Tipperary, have been saved

None of the last seven penalties in this year's Championship have found the net while the last three, including John O'Dwyer's for Tipperary, have been saved

None of the last seven penalties in this year's Championship have found the net while the last three, including John O'Dwyer's for Tipperary, have been saved

Tipperary's failure to convert two penalties in last Sunday's drawn All-Ireland final with Kilkenny has prompted huge debate over the 'Nash' rule, here we look at what the GAA could do to solve the problem of the penalty in hurling.

1. Mono e mono

As has been widely accepted as a better alternative to the current rule, many observers have suggested that the parameters of the current rule continue but with just the goalkeeper on the goal line.

The removal of the two defenders either side of the keeper would definitely tip the balance on favour of the attacking side.

Reader Eric_Shun suggested in the comments section below that we could have two players on the line rather than three.

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Kilkenny goalkeeper Eoin Murphy celebrates his side's third goal. GAA Hurling All Ireland Senior Championship Final, Kilkenny v Tipperary. Croke Park, Dublin. Picture credit: Matt Browne / SPORTSFILE

Kilkenny goalkeeper Eoin Murphy celebrates his side's third goal. GAA Hurling All Ireland Senior Championship Final, Kilkenny v Tipperary. Croke Park, Dublin. Picture credit: Matt Browne / SPORTSFILE

SPORTSFILE

Kilkenny goalkeeper Eoin Murphy celebrates his side's third goal. GAA Hurling All Ireland Senior Championship Final, Kilkenny v Tipperary. Croke Park, Dublin. Picture credit: Matt Browne / SPORTSFILE

 

2. A penalty spot

The penalty rule in gaelic games was revolutionised when the penalty spot was moved from the 14-yard line to 12 yards out giving goalkeepers less time to react to the shot.

In an amendment to the Nash rule, a line could be placed midway between the 14 and 21 yard line that penalty-takers couldn't breach.

Penalties become easier to convert and the safety concerns that persisted with the old rule are lessened.

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James O'Donoghue scores his second penalty of the game yesterday in the Gaelic Grouds. Picture credit: Stephen McCarthy / SPORTSFILE

James O'Donoghue scores his second penalty of the game yesterday in the Gaelic Grouds. Picture credit: Stephen McCarthy / SPORTSFILE

SPORTSFILE

James O'Donoghue scores his second penalty of the game yesterday in the Gaelic Grouds. Picture credit: Stephen McCarthy / SPORTSFILE

 

3. A 'penalty' goal

What if hurling took a leaf out of rugby union's book?

If the referee decides that a goal was likely to have been scored had the foul not taken place, he could award a 'penalty' goal.

It would negate the need for a penalty in certain cases.

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 Leinster players celebrate after being awarded a late penalty try against Connacht.

Leinster players celebrate after being awarded a late penalty try against Connacht.

SPORTSFILE

Leinster players celebrate after being awarded a late penalty try against Connacht.

 

4. Leave the rule as it exists

Make no alterations to the rule that exists, with the taker not allowed to breach the 21-yard line and the goalkeeper and two defenders on the goal line.

This rule has been criticised for being too heavily weighted in the defending team's favour.

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7 September 2014; Kilkenny goalkeeper Eoin Murphy and midfielder Richie Hogan, save a first half Tipperary penalty. GAA Hurling All Ireland Senior Championship Final, Kilkenny v Tipperary. Croke Park, Dublin. Picture credit: Stephen McCarthy / SPORTSFILE

7 September 2014; Kilkenny goalkeeper Eoin Murphy and midfielder Richie Hogan, save a first half Tipperary penalty. GAA Hurling All Ireland Senior Championship Final, Kilkenny v Tipperary. Croke Park, Dublin. Picture credit: Stephen McCarthy / SPORTSFILE

SPORTSFILE

7 September 2014; Kilkenny goalkeeper Eoin Murphy and midfielder Richie Hogan, save a first half Tipperary penalty. GAA Hurling All Ireland Senior Championship Final, Kilkenny v Tipperary. Croke Park, Dublin. Picture credit: Stephen McCarthy / SPORTSFILE

 

5. Return to old rule

Allow players to lift and strike as they please and ignore safety concerns.

Anthony Nash and TJ Reid perfected the art of flinging the sliotar into the air and hitting it on the full from inside the 14 yard line, it was effective but very dangerous.

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Anthony Nash, Cork, shoots to score his side's second goal in the All-Ireland final

Anthony Nash, Cork, shoots to score his side's second goal in the All-Ireland final

SPORTSFILE

Anthony Nash, Cork, shoots to score his side's second goal in the All-Ireland final

- Independent.ie reader Bolton1 made this suggestion: 'I'd favour one-on-one but the ball must be struck from a penalty spot, off the ground. Sideline cut style. Lifting and striking weighs it too heavily in the attacker's favour.'

Have you thought of any alternatives? Let us hear your ideas in the comments section below. We've already had some very good suggestions so keep them coming!

Online Editors