| 18.4°C Dublin

Close

Premium


If the GAA's full-time executive aren’t making and implementing the big decisions, why are they there at all?

Colm O'Rourke


Change has to be left in hands of the experts

Close

Mayo goalkeeper Rob Hennelly takes a kick-out during last year's All-Ireland final. Photo by Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile

Mayo goalkeeper Rob Hennelly takes a kick-out during last year's All-Ireland final. Photo by Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile

Uachtarán Chumann Lúthchleas Gael Larry McCarthy announces the result of Motion 19, regarding the restructure of the GAA football championship, which did not get the required 60% to pass, and so failed, during the GAA Special Congress at Croke Park in Dublin. Photo by Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile

Uachtarán Chumann Lúthchleas Gael Larry McCarthy announces the result of Motion 19, regarding the restructure of the GAA football championship, which did not get the required 60% to pass, and so failed, during the GAA Special Congress at Croke Park in Dublin. Photo by Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile

/

Mayo goalkeeper Rob Hennelly takes a kick-out during last year's All-Ireland final. Photo by Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile

The business of making a wishlist for the future is something I don’t find particularly rewarding as I have seen too many well-crafted GAA reports buried, ignored or just destroyed by sheer indifference. On that basis, I have always been amused by John Maynard Keynes, one of the great economists of his time, who famously said that “in the long run we are all dead”. No point in much long-term planning there.

Yet every evolving organisation needs plans for the future. The big problem in the GAA is that those who write plans do not have the power to implement them. Without someone to decide on a policy and see it through on a daily basis, all plans are left to the discretion of others.


Most Watched





Privacy