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Brian Mullins' legacy is secure after a career in two parts

Eamonn Sweeney


BRIAN MULLINS: 1954-2022 – The embodiment of Dublin’s spirit

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Brian Mullins. Photo: Stephen McCarthy

Brian Mullins. Photo: Stephen McCarthy

Brian Mullins tussling with Kerry’s Jack O’Shea in ‘85.

Brian Mullins tussling with Kerry’s Jack O’Shea in ‘85.

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Brian Mullins. Photo: Stephen McCarthy

Colossus was the word that came to mind when you thought of Brian Mullins. He was a big, powerful, imposing man with a big, powerful, imposing personality whose stature in the game was much greater than the mere sum of his performances.

That’s saying something because the St Vincent’s man was one of the greatest midfielders in football history. But, like his old rival Páidí Ó Sé, Mullins possessed an indefinable extra quality which made him seem the embodiment of his county’s essential character. For a generation of fans, both inside and outside the capital, he was the quintessential Dub, even if his uncle was Bill Casey, the great centre half-back on the Kerry three in a row team of 1939-1941.


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