| 13.8°C Dublin

Bluebeat: Faughs celebrate proud memories

Harry Boland played with Dublin’s most successful hurling club

Close

Irish revolutionary Harry Boland, right, pictured with Michael Collins (l) and Mr Dunphy at a hurling match in Croke Park, Dublin 1921.

Irish revolutionary Harry Boland, right, pictured with Michael Collins (l) and Mr Dunphy at a hurling match in Croke Park, Dublin 1921.

14 January 1996; Joe McNally, Dublin. Football. Picture credit; Brendan Moran / SPORTSFILE

14 January 1996; Joe McNally, Dublin. Football. Picture credit; Brendan Moran / SPORTSFILE

/

Irish revolutionary Harry Boland, right, pictured with Michael Collins (l) and Mr Dunphy at a hurling match in Croke Park, Dublin 1921.

These would be happy days for Eamonn Rea. He won the MacCarthy Cup with Limerick in 1973. It was a long wait for the next bus.

On the Munster Championship days, Rea, and a few of the faithful, would gather for breakfast at his pub in Parkgate Street before going across to Hueston. Travelling more in hope than expectation.

He gave so much to Faughs. And he did it in such a quiet way. That’s the nature of the club. They have won 31 Dublin Senior Hurling Championship titles but they prefer to talk about the local kids coming through the Tymon gates. And their successful merger with Celtic.

Eamonn would have enjoyed last Sunday. The re-opening of their pitch, and remembering former player, Harry Boland, who became Chairman of the Dublin County Board.

The club made a presentation of a replica of the Harry Boland silver Cup to the Dublin County Board for the Dublin Intermediate Hurling Championship. There were exhibition games, music and song.

As another famous milestone in the storied history of Faughs was celebrated. They won the Dublin Senior Hurling Championship in 1920.

They went on to represent Dublin in the All-Ireland. The All-Ireland final wasn’t played till 1922 because of the War of Independence. Faughs/Dublin beat Cork in the final at Croke Park, winning the Great Southern and Western Railway Cup. Still one of the club’s most treasured possessions.

St Anne’s stage McNally masters

In Bohernabreena, once again, the hills are alive with the sound of music.

It’s the return of the AIG Joe McNally All-Ireland Invitational Masters 7’s Tournament. It takes place on Saturday, September 10th.

St Anne’s will host a competition that carries the name of one of Dublin’s favourite sons.

GAA Newsletter

Exclusives from under the skin of the GAA, from Ireland’s largest and best GAA team; Brolly, Mullane, Hogan and Ó Sé, to name but a few.

This field is required

He has long been a master of his art. He’s had some famous days in blue. Perhaps the best of all was down by the Lee in ’83 as the Dubs overcame Cork in the All-Ireland SFC semi-final replay in the sunshine before beating Galway in the rain.

For St Anne’s and the Dubs, Joe has crafted every shot. Every pass. Turning the ball into a puppet.

The entry fee for the event is €200. To register, email masterstournament.joemcnally@gmail.com

More details from Niall Bergin (086-3484108)/Jonathan Flood (087-2558537)/Myles Murphy (083-8970203).

Night for Con’s life and work

Frank Greally has organised a special event this Thursday – ‘A Celebration of Con Houlihan’s Life and Work on the 10th anniversary of his passing.’

It’s on at The Lower Deck, Portobello (from 8.0). All are welcome. There will be readings, music, songs and stories.

Sean Creedon, as Con might say, has cobbled together some of Con’s gems. Including the famous: “Paddy Cullen ran back to his goal like a woman who smelled a cake burning in the oven.”

And on Eoin Liston’s third goal in the 1978 All-Ireland final: “The Hill was as quiet as main street, Knocknagoshel on a Good Friday.”

On a trip to Wembley, he went into a café. He was touched by its friendliness. “It was the kind of place where you could ask a fella at the next table for a loan of a spoon.”

Colum McCann wrote: “He sat at the Sports Desk, the big blue anorak draped over his chair. No typewriter, no notebook. He wrote on a sheet of paper, sometimes he would only fit a single sentence on the page. He had a deep Kerry accent: you could hear the turf in it.”

Una helped all to bloom

Una Connolly did such magnificent work at St Mark’s and Thomas Davis. She gave so much to the community. She had time for everyone.

She was a brilliant mentor and coach. Encouraging the children to stand tall. Filling them with confidence. Instilling the good habits. She followed the Dubs.

A highlight each year in the locality was the Christy Reardon Under-15 Football Tournament which honoured the memory of her brother.

She made everyone’s day a little brighter. A smile. A simple hello. Helping others was her life’s work. All in Tallaght will cherish her memory.


Related topics


Most Watched





Privacy