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Buckley exit from Kerry backroom is being seen by some as a game-breaker, but Peter Keane is his own man

Colm Keys



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Arranged marriage: Donie Buckley wasn’t part of Kerry boss Peter Keane’s All-Ireland winning minor set-ups. Photo: Brendan Moran/Sportsfile

Arranged marriage: Donie Buckley wasn’t part of Kerry boss Peter Keane’s All-Ireland winning minor set-ups. Photo: Brendan Moran/Sportsfile

SPORTSFILE

Arranged marriage: Donie Buckley wasn’t part of Kerry boss Peter Keane’s All-Ireland winning minor set-ups. Photo: Brendan Moran/Sportsfile

How often has the emergence of an exciting talent been met with the proviso that there's an even more exciting younger sibling at home ready to make an even greater impact? It's a classic GAA thing. Another story behind the story.

Just as the success of a manager will often be qualified by the presence of a coach who was considered the real 'brains' behind the operation, the person who laid out the game-plan, got the players onside and made it work. Only for them... Even All-Ireland-winning managers in the last two decades will have listened to how their own influence was diluted in some quarters by such rationale.

Coaches can often exist behind a Teflon cloak. Win and a greater portion of the credit will inevitably fall their way from those 'in the know.' Lose and their influence was suppressed, the manager didn't give them enough time on the training field to implement strategies.