Sport

Tuesday 13 November 2018

Death of boxing hero Tiedt

IRISH boxing legend Fred Tiedt died yesterday morning in Dublin's Mount Carmel Hospital after a long illness. Tiedt (60) put Irish boxing on the map by winning a welterweight silver medal at the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne.

IRISH boxing legend Fred Tiedt died yesterday morning in Dublin's Mount Carmel Hospital after a long illness. Tiedt (60) put Irish boxing on the map by winning a welterweight silver medal at the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne.

Minister for Tourism, Sport and Recreation Dr Jim McDaid led the tributes saying: ``I would like to express my appreciation of Fred for all the thrills he gave us in Melbourne and the outstanding service he gave to his beloved sport of boxing''.

An Appreciation ...

I FIRST met Fred Tiedt in the old Trinity College Boxing Gym, a hot, sweaty, overcrowded room hidden away in the corner of the college campus.

Like the Pied Piper, Fred was leading the 20 or so students through their paces and no matter how tough it became, nobody dared to question his instructions.

Even in his training gear, Fred was impeccable, as perfectly groomed that day as he would be for every day of the 29 years of our friendship.

Even before we met, I knew of the famous Fred Tiedt as an Olympic boxer, who had been robbed of the gold medal in Melbourne in 1956 and had to make do with the silver.

But the Fred Tiedt I subsequently grew to know was as much a friend and ally as he was an unparalleled sporting mentor.

In truth, Fred Tiedt was a surrogate father to hundreds of students who benefited from his training, advice and his unfailing good humour.

No matter how important a title might have been, Fred would never send an ill-prepared student in to fight, another reason why his proteges were so unswervingly loyal to his commands.

As far as Fred was concerned, physical and mental fitness was paramount and he would tell myself and my brothers Terry and Joe that boxing was a mug's game unless you were at the peak of your abilities. I never lost a fight with Fred in my corner.

Even after I hung up my gloves, Fred was still in my corner, he'll always be there. - MC



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