Sport

Thursday 22 February 2018

Average resale price for Super Bowl tickets nearing $4000

The NFL logo at midfield of MetLife Stadium is illuminated by lights on television reporters' videocameras as members of the media are given a tour under a tarp used by crews to keep the turf dry ahead of Super Bowl XLVIII
The NFL logo at midfield of MetLife Stadium is illuminated by lights on television reporters' videocameras as members of the media are given a tour under a tarp used by crews to keep the turf dry ahead of Super Bowl XLVIII

LARRY FINE

Tickets to the National Football League's first cold-weather Super Bowl are a hot item, with some climate-controlled suites in New Jersey's MetLife Stadium priced at $1 million.

Following Sunday's conference championships that set up a Denver-Seattle Super Bowl on February 2nd, the average resale price of tickets on secondary markets was $3,721, the highest figure in five years of tracking, according to SeatGeek.

No single ticket on the secondary market had sold for under $2,000, a price that was 33 percent more than what the cheapest ticket sold for on conference championship Sunday during each of the past three NFL playoffs, the website said.

Face value of individual Super Bowl tickets ranges from $1,000-$2,600.

For high-rollers, one suite on the Commissioner's Level of MetLife Stadium, the shared home of the New York Giants and New York Jets, is listed for $1.019 million. The same luxury suite for an entire Giants or Jets regular season sells for $350,000.

There were more than 12,000 tickets listed on secondary markets as of late Sunday, representing roughly 15 percent of the capacity at MetLife Stadium.

Ticket broker Lance Patania told New Jersey's Star Ledger newspaper that he expected a busy market immediately following the conference title games as fans of the winning teams react.

Patania, who buys and sells between 200 and 300 tickets for each Super Bowl, said the game's location, across the Hudson River from Manhattan, is a key factor in interest for the event despite the likelihood of wintry weather.

"The game is really insignificant," Patania said. "Everything leading up to the game is what the whole experience is about.

"And New York has shopping, and Broadway. There's hockey and basketball. There are a million things to do."

Online Editors

Promoted Links

Sport Newsletter

The best sport action straight to your inbox every morning.

Promoted Links

Editor's Choice

Also in Sport