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Tomhaggard women get creative

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At the unveiling (from left): Pat Dunne, Patricia Bates, Mairead Devereux, Mary White, Marie Moore, Cllr Jim Moore, Kathleen Tierney (tutor), Gina Murphy (designer), Grainne Dullard and Eleanor Kelly

At the unveiling (from left): Pat Dunne, Patricia Bates, Mairead Devereux, Mary White, Marie Moore, Cllr Jim Moore, Kathleen Tierney (tutor), Gina Murphy (designer), Grainne Dullard and Eleanor Kelly

At the unveiling (from left): Pat Dunne, Patricia Bates, Mairead Devereux, Mary White, Marie Moore, Cllr Jim Moore, Kathleen Tierney (tutor), Gina Murphy (designer), Grainne Dullard and Eleanor Kelly

A large piece of felt art created by members of Tomhaggard Women's Shed, was unveiled at a ceremony in the local hall.

The project led by facilitator Kathleen Tierney, was funded by the Arts Department of Wexford County Council under the Creative Ireland Scheme.

The brief was to 'strengthen the status of the craft and design sector as a vital part of cultural, social and economic life in Wexford and also to develop public awareness of craft mediums, techniques and design process'.

Eight women took part in the Felting Heritage project, including Mary White, Maria Murphy, Gina Murphy, Mairead Devereux, Grainne Dullard, Patricia Bates, Pat Dunne and Eleanor Kelly.

It took eight weeks to create with the women gathering for three hours once a week, learning the age old art of felt making, including dry and wet felting and needle felting.

At the outset, the women were asked to take photos of local historical and cultural areas in the parish of Kilmore and from these were chosen a celtic cross (depicting the area's Catholic heritage), a stained glass window, pikes (depicting the 1798 Rising) and the Kilmore crosses in the hawthorn trees.

The images wre transferred onto a large plastic sheet by the artist Gina Murphy followed by the task of transferring all the wools and felting the whole piece together, which was no mean feat for beginners.The piece was framed and mounted by local carpenter Michael Carr who did the work for free.

Wexford People