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Student commutes 180km daily as accommodation crisis continues

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Christine O'Mahony from Balrath Co Meath during a protest over comments by CEO of Dublin City Council Owen Keegan. Photo: Gareth Chaney/Collins Photos Dublin

Christine O'Mahony from Balrath Co Meath during a protest over comments by CEO of Dublin City Council Owen Keegan. Photo: Gareth Chaney/Collins Photos Dublin

Christine O'Mahony from Balrath Co Meath during a protest over comments by CEO of Dublin City Council Owen Keegan. Photo: Gareth Chaney/Collins Photos Dublin

wexfordpeople

While the closure of college campuses and lecture halls deprived students of the complete third-level experience, it did spare them the stress of trying to find somewhere suitable to live. But no sooner did our third-level institutions get the green light to welcome students back then the annual frenzy for accommodation resumed in earnest. And while some have been lucky enough to find the perfect place to live, to immerse themselves in the college experience completely, others have not been so lucky.

Daniel Vetrila’s day begins at 5.30 a.m., he gets up, has some breakfast and hopes that his father, who works night shifts, isn’t too tired to drive him from their home in Bridgetown to Wexford town. One way or another Daniel must get into town before 7.20 a.m., for the bus to Carlow IT, the only bus. And once he gets to college he must stay there until 5.04 p.m., until the bus for home departs. While his classmates drop in and out, amble in for lectures at their leisure, Daniel’s routine has more in common with a commuting businessman than a first-year student.


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