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‘I looked at my two young daughters and cried’ – Wexford vigil organiser on hearing of Ashling Murphy murder

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Vigil in memory of Ashling Murphy who was murdered while out running in Offaly,on Wexford Quay on Friday afternoon. Lorraine Lozano organiser

Vigil in memory of Ashling Murphy who was murdered while out running in Offaly,on Wexford Quay on Friday afternoon. Lorraine Lozano organiser

Vigil in memory of Ashling Murphy who was murdered while out running in Offaly,on Wexford Quay on Friday afternoon. Lorraine Lozano organiser

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Lorraine Lozano, organiser of the vigil for Ashling Murphy on Wexford quay front on Friday evening, said the answer to violence against women doesn’t lie in them having to take more precautions to keep themselves safe.

"I think it has been a very heavy time since hearing about Ashling.  It has brought up that fear for women,  the constant fear associated with being a female, the fear of going out alone after it gets dark. I can’t go out to my car at night without carrying a knife or some other weapon with me, just in case.”

"It’s that fear of always having to take  precautions to not get attacked, the fear that every woman grows up with. You can't go out for a walk at night, and now you can’t go for a run in broad daylight. It’s beyond comprehension."

Lorraine, who works as a Doula, offering support in pregnancy and childbirth, said the day after Ashling Murphy’s murder, she just sat down at the kitchen table and looked at her two young daughters and cried.

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"It’s not the kind of world I would ever have wished for them to grow up in, where women can’t go for a walk at night time and now, they can’t go for a run in broad daylight.  Ashling could have been anyone’s daughter.”

"Since it happened, every woman is on even higher alert than usual. When you’re walking on the road, if you see a man at all, you’re wondering is he gone now, is it safe. We tell ourselves, oh it’s just  paranoia. But we shouldn’t have to feel that way.

"All of us have our stories of feeling intimidated. I remember when I was 15, walking on the road, and this jeep full of grown men started following me, jeering me and asking ‘do you want to get in’.

"We all have more than one, more than two, more than three stories to tell. I just want to be able to go out walking and not be afraid.”

"The answer is definitely not that we have to take more precautions. It’s more about educating boys from a young age.”


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