Wexford

| 27°C Dublin


Why do we seek cyber friends on Facebook, when there are real people all around us?

Pierce Turner


Close

Camaraderie was once something that just happened by proxy, but not any more. People need people.

Camaraderie was once something that just happened by proxy, but not any more. People need people.

Camaraderie was once something that just happened by proxy, but not any more. People need people.

wexfordpeople

When we think about our goals in life, in what order do we list our priorities? It depends on who you are of course, and where you come from, how great your ambitions are and what your talents are.

Some people are born into a family with their future mapped out for them, of course they may break out of it and be an exception. But for most of us life has not been so resolutely designed. We are more inclined to follow a path that falls before us as we discover.

Education is always a safe footing to begin on, through it we learn how to operate within the measurements and methods that have been settled on by the current dominant forces, even those of us who are not particularly inspired by this road, can still survive with that handbook. It is strongly advised to take this road, especially if you are unsure.

So is this the goal? Survival! I doubt that too many teenagers would agree with that, but in the end that is the bottom line, even if we are not aware of it. And with time it becomes obvious that the goal is to survive for as long as possible. Most of us believe that wealth, health and happiness, are the key elements to achieve this goal, what’s the point of survival without happiness we ask.

This is Wexford Newsletter

A weekly update on the top stories from County Wexford in news and sport, direct to your inbox

This field is required

But sustaining happiness is not so easy, and the way to achieve it are deceptive. One of the great twists in life is the simplicity of perfection, we are inclined to think it too obvious, so we keep looking beyond it for something harder. It was even written in the bible – The Lord preserves the simple;

Just today Clare mentioned someone who is very happy at her job, so I asked why? “Well she works with a really nice bunch of people, you know what it’s like when you work with a bunch of other people, you have a good laugh.” We were lying in bed at the time having our second cup of tea, and this statement set me off on a train of thought.

The train took me backwards to my teenage years when I was in a professional band. From 18 to 21, I spent five days a week driving around Ireland in a van with seven other blokes from Dublin. We told each other everything, very little was kept secret, we laughed a lot, and no one needed therapy. When we had a bad gig, sharing it with others eased the pain. At night our necks were nearly broken from flying around corners on the empty road, so we complained together. It was one of the happiest times of my life, and I was rarely as bored or uninspired as the lonely days that I had spent working behind the counter of our record shop on my own.

I bet camaraderie would not be high on most people’s list for the goal of happiness, because it’s too simple, and it’s free. But it should probably be first. Yet with time we seem to be getting further away from it.

The separation begins early, with children on their tablets – and us on our computers, and more and more of us work from home, alone. We think it’s independence, but it’s the opposite, and is taking us down a road where we work tirelessly to seek what we have thrown away, camaraderie.

So now we seek cyber friends on Facebook, when there are real people all around us. Camaraderie was once something that just happened by proxy, but not any more. People need people.


Privacy