independent

Friday 16 November 2018

How Pauline's life was 'turned upside down' by her trip to Tanzanian town

Life is a delicate balancing act –Victoria Smurfit and Pauline McLynn, World Vision Ireland patrons, on their trip to Africa to visit their sponsored children. This is just one of the pictures that will be on show at Electric Picnic festival this week-end.
Life is a delicate balancing act –Victoria Smurfit and Pauline McLynn, World Vision Ireland patrons, on their trip to Africa to visit their sponsored children. This is just one of the pictures that will be on show at Electric Picnic festival this week-end.

Well known Sligo-born actress and author, Pauline McLynn, has told how her life has been 'turned upside down and inside out' by a trip to a poverty ravaged rural town in Tanzania. Despite the extreme poverty she witnessed in Kwamtoro, Pauline and her actor friend, Victoria Smurfit were uplifted by the indominatable spirit of the local community.The actors visited Tanzania i

By Jim Gray

Well known Sligo-born actress and author, Pauline McLynn, has told how her life has been 'turned upside down and inside out' by a trip to a poverty ravaged rural town in Tanzania.

Despite the extreme poverty she witnessed in Kwamtoro, Pauline and her actor friend, Victoria Smurfit were uplifted by the indominatable spirit of the local community.

The actors visited Tanzania in the heart of Africa as part of a project by World Vision Ireland, of which they are patrons and child sponsors. Their incredible journey is chronicled in a stunning exhibition of photographs by Victoria and accompanying commentary by Pauline, which will be on display at the Electric Picnic festival in Stradbally, Co. Laois this week-end.

In Pauline’s words “the trip turned us upside down and inside out and sent us home with a spring in our, previously tired, Western step and a vigour for life that money alone could never buy”.

Victoria took the stunning photographs which very beautifully depict what life is like for people living in one community where World Vision Ireland works in Tanzania while Pauline provided the commentary which tells the story of the trip picture by picture.

Rich in spirit

Pauline is encouraging Sligo festival-goers to visit the exhibition: “The trip to Tanzania with World Vision Ireland was one of the most amazing experiences I’ve had. The incredible people I met are certainly materially poor but are rich in spirit and courage. I think that comes through in the photos. Victoria and I are really proud of the exhibition. I hope that when people are looking for a break from the festival madness they will drop by and take a look”.

The exhibition is part of World Vision Ireland’s campaign to sign up 1,000 additional child sponsors by the end of September to help alleviate the extreme poverty suffered by millions in Africa.

Pauline said: “Every day 30,000 African children die because they live in extreme poverty. By September 30th another 1,830,000 children will have died. By sponsoring a child we are doing something which can help prevent children from dying because they are poor.

"Child sponsorship gives you the opportunity to bring clean water, food, healthcare and education to a child in desperate need, as well as bringing about long-term changes in their community. These are things we often take for granted in Ireland".

World Vision Ireland urgently needs 1,000 additional child sponsors by the end of September to help communities get the food, clean water, education and healthcare they need.



World Vision Ireland child sponsorship costs just ?25 a month. That’s just 82c a day. For more information please visit www.worldvision.ie or text “sponsor” to 51500.





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