independent

Wednesday 17 October 2018

A lone woman in a mans world

Recollections of an Irish horse dealer , is the sub-title of Marjorie Quarton's 13th book and such activity marks her out as a lone woman in a man's world.

Recollections of an Irish horse dealer , is the sub-title of Marjorie Quarton's 13th book and such activity marks her out as a lone woman in a man's world.

Thursday night's launch was introduced by Melanie Scott, North Tipperary Arts Officer, who said it was the first time Marjorie had had a launch locally.

Seamus Hosey said he first met Marjorie at the South Tipperary Writers week-end in Clonmel in1998. Through her works, her novels, her journalism, her memoirs, her childrens books, he found the same sense of celebration of life that he discovered on meeting her personally, an independent spirit who grew up in difficult times and who was not going to be broken.

Her latest book, he described as a fascinating glimpse into the Ireland of the 1930's and thereafter, a world that was fast vanishing but one where she made her way, where, traditionally women did not enter. And there she made her own impact and the hallmark of a life lived to the full was what one found in this book.

KNEW BY HEARSAY

Hers was a blend of entertainment and information-giving, in dealing wth a time so many now only knew by hearsay. She had chronicled very importantly the social life, the life of the country, the life of horse dealers, the fairs, the country of Tipperary and surrounding counties in her young days.

He wished her many years to entertain, to enlighten, to delight us in her fiction and in her memoir writing.

Seamus Hosey congratulated the publishers Lilliput Press on bringing out such a splendid issue of Marjorie's book and for continuing to bring us books like this, books that might be overlooked in this so-called rampant age of the Celtic Tiger, books that were important in telling us who and what we were, and where we came from.

SPEECHLESS

Responding, Marjorie described herself as being absolutely speeechless. Having thanked Seamus Hosey for his words, she said that never had such words been said about her before without qualification. She thanked the Lilliput Press for publishing the book, and the library for affording them the facility in which to launch Breakfast the Night Before.



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