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Last stand: Trinity Gardens’ protest against high-rise block

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“This is our last chance; but it’s a war and we won’t give up without a fight”.

The battle-cry from the beleaguered residents of Trinity Gardens, as they met on Saturday for one last ditch attempt to preserve the current landscape of their small estate.

Louth County Council has given the go-ahead to Urban Life for the the construction of 57 apartments on the sire of the former Swan Yard, rising to seven-storeys in parts.

The site is bounded to the east by George's Street, to the south by Trinity Street, to the west by the rear gardens of dwellings within Trinity Gardens and to the north by a property fronting George's Street and its rear garden.

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"This is a symbolic protest in many ways to show how unfair the whole planning process is,” explains spokesman Dom Gradwell. “We always knew the Swan Yard would be developed, it just the inappropriate structure we don’t agree with, and we have just lodged an appeal with An Bord Pleanala, outlining our many valid submissions.”

 The development would consist of construction of a 'Build to Rent' residential development which varies in height from 1-2 storeys along the western and northern boundaries and from 3-7 storeys on George’s Street, comprising 57 apartments and communal residents support services and amenities with a central courtyard and car parking area to contain 17 car parking spaces.

It also includes the creation of a new vehicular entrance off the local access road to Trinity Gardens to the south of the site including a new footpath and public lighting along the southern site boundary and the creation of a public open space onto Georges Street including footpath widening.

"The council sold us out by voting in favour of this development, and this is really our last chance to stop this from happening,” says Dom. “In situations like this, the developer gets to sit with the planner, and yet the first we ever know is when we see a notice on the wall.”

A previous planning application by Urban Life for a 65-apartment development was withdrawn in September 2020 after major objections by local residents, but the revised application got the green light in December.

Residents are in favour of "a low-rise only development in keeping with the general area”.


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