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Liza casts an eye over horrors and humours of the past

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Liza Mulvihill at home in Glin where she recalls the highs and lows of almost a century of life.

Liza Mulvihill at home in Glin where she recalls the highs and lows of almost a century of life.

Liza Mulvihill at home in Glin where she recalls the highs and lows of almost a century of life.

A NORTH Kerry woman who is a mere four years from her 100th birthday is to feature in an extraordinary new book that provides an invaluable link to our past.

Liza Mulvuhill from Moyvane tells her fascinating life story in Vanishing Ireland: Recollections of our Changing Times – a collaboration by award winning photographer James Fennell and bestselling author Turtle Bunbury who journeyed the length and breadth of Ireland to interview ordinary men and women who share memories of growing up in rural Ireland.

Now living in Glin, 96year-old Liza chronicles the highs and lows of a life spanning almost 100 years — from innocent times of walking barefoot to school in Ballyguiltenane to horrendous memories of standing with her mother at the cottage door as a troop of drunken Black and Tans gunned down three men from nearby Knockanure.

"I got afraid seeing all the men and I ran. One of them put up the gun to shoot me. They thought I was running to tell the IRA they were coming. My mother was in a panic until another one said, "Stop, don't shoot the child," Liza recalls in he book.

In a frank and open interview, Liza also recalls the tragic death of her sister and how she and her mother were left to rear her children; travelling to Tarbert Regatta by horse and cart with her friend Kitty Walshe, her tough life as a farm labourer; the exctement of seeing the St Patrick's Day parade in New York at 36 years of age and walkng four miles to mass and fasting from midnight once a month before she received Holy Communion.


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