High praise for newest edition of Archaeological and Historical Society journal

Tony Bergin and Dr Conor Brosnan in Dingle Library for the launch of the Kerry Archaeological and Historical Society Journal last week. Photo by Declan Malone.
Tony Bergin and Dr Conor Brosnan in Dingle Library for the launch of the Kerry Archaeological and Historical Society Journal last week. Photo by Declan Malone.

Tadhg Evans

The evergreen and ever-popular Pat Nelligan offered no little praise to everyone involved with the latest edition of the Kerry Archaeological and Historical Society journal, as the author, historian, and former secondary school teacher launched the newest volume of the long-running publication.

A good-sized and appreciative crowd gathered in Dingle Library in recent days to hear Mr Nelligan provide an overview of the publication, while its editor, Tony Bergin, and Society President Marie O'Sullivan were also present to give a few words.

Afterwards, there was an opportunity for those in the audience to pick up a copy and have a read for themselves. Dingle Library was an apt venue for the occasion given that Mr Bergin, originally from Laois, now resides in neighbouring Lios Póil - and there's also a strong west Kerry flavour running through the publication's content.

Dr Conor Brosnan's article focuses on smuggling in Dingle, prevalent during the 18th and 19th centuries; while Raidió na Gaeltachta journalist and west Kerry man Dáithí de Mórdha addresses the sinking of a sloop, 'Brilliant', in a storm off Ceann Sibéal just over 100 years ago, as well as the conflict and tragedy that arose between west Kerry contingents vying to claim the stricken ship.

Dr Tony Barnard looked into local politics and familial tensions in Dingle during the late 18th century; University of Aberdeen's Dr James O'Driscoll offers an achaeology paper on the Hillforts of Faha (near Brandon Mountain) and Caherconree (Sliaibh Mis); and Kay Caball, author of 'Kerry Girls: Emigration and the Earl Grey Scheme', looks into Quakers in Kerry during the Famine.  "They're meticulously researched, and the standard of writing is so high, they're quite incredible," Mr Nelligan said of the pieces on the night of the launch. "Each of these five articles could probably be read in an hour... that doesn't reflect hundreds of hours of work. They are a credit to the writers."

Kerryman

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