Extreme weather could be the norm

local experts warn that kerry could experience increasingly bizarre weather patterns

Jo Harty, Caroline and Evan Lemass, Tony Harty, Colm Griffin and Rory Lemass, landing a huge snowball at Moynihan’s, Lackabane, Killarney. Photo by Michelle Cooper Galvin
Jo Harty, Caroline and Evan Lemass, Tony Harty, Colm Griffin and Rory Lemass, landing a huge snowball at Moynihan’s, Lackabane, Killarney. Photo by Michelle Cooper Galvin

Sinead Kelleher

More extreme weather conditions will take place in Kerry over the coming years and will have detrimental effects on infrastructure if the county is not prepared.

The warning comes following Storm Emma and Beast from East last week which led to heavy snow across the county. 

Micheál O'Coileáin of Transition Kerry said this week these storms are indicators of climate change and the effects it has on weather patterns and this type of "extreme" weather will continue. "We can expect more extreme weather conditions." 

Storms like Storm Orphelia which led to flooding and damage around the county as well as Storm Emma and The Beast from the East which brought heavy snowfall. 

"There are trends emerging in our short memory span of a number of unusual and bizarre weather trends all of which seem to be going in the wrong direction." 

"It is not like we haven't had this weather before but it is now events that were one in 100 years are now once in a decade." 

"They are becoming more regular instead of being the exception."

Transition Kerry held a climate change conference last year which focused on the effects climate change would have on Kerry which included fears of flooding in many coastal areas. Maps show that swatches of land in Kerry could be under water in the coming years if steps are not taken to protect coastal areas. 

"Every year now we set a record for weather and that is what climate change is about," said Micheál.

The former Kerry County Council Environmental officer says that extreme weather conditions will have "serious repercussions" for coastal counties in particular including Kerry. 

"Roads closed, damage to beaches and piers, and to coastal infrastructure will be caused by this type of weather." He says the weather will also have a detrimental effect on industry as well in particularly farming and fishing. 

Transition Kerry are hoping to encourage communities to look at more sustainable ways of living to try and counteract climate change and such weather patterns have emerged in recent years.

Kerryman

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