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Gabriel bids a 'farewell to poetry'

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Celebrated Moyvane poet Gabriel Fitzmaurice has published his newest book which he has titled 'A Farewell to Poetry'

Celebrated Moyvane poet Gabriel Fitzmaurice has published his newest book which he has titled 'A Farewell to Poetry'

Celebrated Moyvane poet Gabriel Fitzmaurice has published his newest book which he has titled 'A Farewell to Poetry'

For Moyvane's own resident poet extraordinaire, Gabriel Fitzmaurice, it seems that the time has come for him to put away his pen and paper once and for all.

That's right, the celebrated poet, who has been described as one of "Ireland's most prodigious poets" and one of the "great characters of the Irish arts" has written what he is claiming will be his last ever poem and his heading into the sunset of retirement.

A primary school teacher for over 30 years before retiring as a principal in 2007, Fitzmaurice has saved the best until last. In a farewell gift to the poetry and literary world, Gabriel has penned a new book - published by Currach Books - and it is entitled 'A Fond Farewell to Poetry', which  is a collection of his very best poems from across a lifetime of writing.

From 1984 to present day, poems, the book includes both his poems for adults and children, poems in the Irish language and translations from Irish and those tackling a diverse range of themes.

The book which is described as a "golden collection" and a "true testimony to his mastery of the craft" is the latest in the long line of 60 books penned by Fitzmaurice, but this, his latest, can easily be described as one of the must-haves for fans of his work.

Some of the works collections included in the book are 'Rainsong' (1984), 'The Village Sings' (1996), 'The Boghole Boys' (2005) and 'Poems of Faith and Doubt' (2011). In the book acknowledgements, Fitzmaurice singles out singer/songwriter Kris Kristofferson for the inspiration to create so many of his works.

Kristofferson is someone, Fitzmaurice says has elevated song-writing to the condition of poetry.

"Kris, friend, fellow poet, I am greatly in your debt," he writes. Speaking about his hanging up of his poetry hat, the Moyvane man simply had this to say: "The job is done. In the words of St Paul: 'I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith."

Kerryman