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Fowler: 'It's our time'

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96, made up of fans' scarves, fills the centre circle before the Hillsborough 25th Anniversary Memorial Service at Anfield. Picture credit: Martin Rickett/PA Wire

96, made up of fans' scarves, fills the centre circle before the Hillsborough 25th Anniversary Memorial Service at Anfield. Picture credit: Martin Rickett/PA Wire

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96, made up of fans' scarves, fills the centre circle before the Hillsborough 25th Anniversary Memorial Service at Anfield. Picture credit: Martin Rickett/PA Wire

ANFIELD scoring legend Robbie Fowler is beginning to believe that Liverpool's time has come to finally claim a Premier League title.

After weeks trying to find reason why Liverpool cannot win the title, he now reckons it's on and that Chelsea will provide the biggest threat

"Every day I'm thinking more and more that they can do it. I still wouldn't write Chelsea off because they are a good team and they just know how to get results, but it is in Liverpool's hands," said Fowler.

"Everyone is saying Chelsea haven't got a goalscorer, but they have got some fantastic defenders. They just don't concede goals."

"You look at the performance when they went to Man City not that long ago and deserved to win, so you can imagine them going to Anfield and playing like that."

"Hopefully, they won't get the same result, but there will be twists and turns up at the top. But it is looking good at the minute."

Meanwhile, thousands of people attended yesterday's memorial service to mark 25 years since the Hillsborough disaster claimed the lives of 96 Liverpool fans.

Loved ones of those who died were joined at Liverpool's Anfield home by players, club officials and ordinary fans to mark the emotional anniversary.

The 96 Liverpool fans died in the crush on the Leppings Lane terraces at Sheffield Wednesday's Hillsborough stadium after going to see their team play Nottingham Forest in an FA Cup semi-final on April 15 1989.

As the families of those who did not return home took their places in reserved seats on Anfield's famous Spion Kop for the start of the service, the crowd got to their feet as one with a roar of approval and a huge ovation from all four sides of the ground.

There were also loud cheers and clapping for the gathering of past and present Anfield greats who attended, including current club captain Steven Gerrard, Kenny Dalglish, manager at the time of the disaster, Ian Rush, Phil Thompson, Alan Hansen and Graeme Souness.

More recent stars Jamie Carragher, Robbie Fowler and Steve McManaman also paid their respects, along with Howard Kendall, Everton's manager in 1989, and current Everton boss Roberto Martinez, who gave a reading.

RESPECTS

Liverpool's first team manager Brendan Rodgers and Leigh MP Andy Burnham also addressed the 24,000-strong crowd, the latter receiving a standing ovation in contrast to the 20th memorial service in 2009 when he was booed and jeered. Since then, he became instrumental in the process of securing new inquests into Britain's worst sporting disaster.

Traditional football hymn Abide With Me was sung before the stadium fell silent as the names of the 96 fans were read out.

Rodgers said his biggest inspiration as manager was each time he came to Anfield and seeing the names of the 96 on the Hillsborough Memorial.

He told the victims' families: "I feel very humble to be in your company.

"You are the real inspiration for us. Your courage, fortitude, resilience and love for the people you lost, it's what inspires me, every day, as the manager of Liverpool Football Club.

"Thank you for the inspiration you give us all. You'll never walk alone."


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