| 14.8°C Dublin

We'll get it right again – kiss

Close

19 February 2013; Ireland assistant coach Les Kiss during a press conference ahead of their RBS Six Nations Rugby Championship match against Scotland on Sunday. Ireland Rugby Press Conference, Carton House, Maynooth, Co. Kildare. Picture credit: Barry Cregg / SPORTSFILE

19 February 2013; Ireland assistant coach Les Kiss during a press conference ahead of their RBS Six Nations Rugby Championship match against Scotland on Sunday. Ireland Rugby Press Conference, Carton House, Maynooth, Co. Kildare. Picture credit: Barry Cregg / SPORTSFILE

19 February 2013; Ireland assistant coach Les Kiss during a press conference ahead of their RBS Six Nations Rugby Championship match against Scotland on Sunday. Ireland Rugby Press Conference, Carton House, Maynooth, Co. Kildare. Picture credit: Barry Cregg / SPORTSFILE

ATTACK coach Les Kiss promises Ireland will be ready for a Scotland side that is at the start of a process of change and development under their new coach Scott Johnson.

"You saw something different from England to Italy. They were passive against England. They didn't really get off the line," said Kiss.

"They certainly did that against Italy and made them pay. They forced some errors and got off to a flyer. They were impressive.

"Scotty Johnson has always been one for trying to instil a bit of flair. Scotland are a team that like to use the ball. It is going to be a pretty good challenge because they rightly are in a pretty good place after a pretty good win back home."

Of course, Ireland will give Scotland the respect they deserve in the video room, while concentrating on putting their own stamp of authority on Sunday's Six Nations match.

There has been progress from the debilitating three-test tour to New Zealand where the series was lost 3-0 and a new identity was forged out of the ashes of that month.

"Recently, we came into a November series with the consistency thing, nailing game-on-game, hanging over us for a hot New Zealand team," said Kiss.

"The boys showed up and they made some good, strong decisions about what they had to do themselves as a group. We didn't quite get into what we were hoping to do in the South African game.

"There was something we built from that. There was consistency we got through to the Fiji game, the Argentinian game and the Welsh game."

It put Ireland in a strong psychological position to deal with a hyped-up England that had not won in Dublin in the Six Nations for 10 years.

"We got to an England game where parts of that were very strong. The dropped balls and fundamental little areas we didn't get a hold of tainted it.

"But, it is about getting results. We understand that. I do think we are improving at getting those performances-on-performances.

"It is a point that we have to beware of. But, I wouldn't say we are down a garden path without something happening positively.

"We can't get lost in thinking we are spiralling down into a poor performance that will destroy what confidence we have."

Just as one victory does not a spring-time make. One defeat does not necessarily a spring-time break. The Irish management is on the right path.

They just have to get together to solve the problem of how to temper their pro-active, attacking philosophy when rain tumbles down from the sky.

"The players have a lot of faith in what we are about at the moment. It is about us getting back on the horse and getting excited about this next challenge.

"We want to get out there and nail winning performances, for sure."


Privacy