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Team Fury make Haye

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British heavyweight boxers David Haye (L) and Tyson Fury attend a press conference to announce their upcoming title fight on July 11.  Picture credit: Shaun Botterill/Getty Images

British heavyweight boxers David Haye (L) and Tyson Fury attend a press conference to announce their upcoming title fight on July 11. Picture credit: Shaun Botterill/Getty Images

British heavyweight boxers David Haye (L) and Tyson Fury attend a press conference to announce their upcoming title fight on July 11. Picture credit: Shaun Botterill/Getty Images

Team Fury is getting its freak on for sure.

Tyson, the 24-year old heavyweight who's trash-talked himself into the headlines, has landed a monster payday, said to be €5.75 million, for his September showdown with David Haye.

As expected Fury won the Battle of the Blather at last week's press conference, telling the world that Haye would require "balls the size of King Kong" if he was to have a chance of beating him.

The bemused former WBA world champion Haye, defeated just twice in 28 fights, played the straight man to the unpredictable Fury. "This fight will really capture the public's imagination," he declared. "And once Fury's dispatched, they'll be very happy."

Standing 6'9", Fury towers over his opponent who's 6'3", but seems teensy by comparison.

Mind you, Haye isn't called The Hayemaker for nothing. His punching power does damage. Of his 26 wins, 24 were by knock-out. Since he lost to Wladimir Klitschko, having gone the distance, he's had just one bout. That was a win against Dereck Chisora last summer. The bookies reckon Haye, a former world champion at two weight divisions, will take this one against the less experienced fighter.

But Fury's coach and mentor Peter Fury, his uncle, isn't so sure. "I think this fight may not be as hard for Tyson as people think it's going to be," he reveals exclusively to The Herald.

"It's not a jump at all because Steve Cunningham (Fury's last opponent) is a two-time world champion. He stepped up to heavyweight and beat the No. 3 in the world Tomasz Adamek but he got robbed. The only person to ever have beaten Adamek was Vitali Klitschko and he took him 10 rounds. Cunningham is a very good fighter."

With Tyson unbeaten in 21 and Peter's promising 18-year old son Hughie already 7-0, Fury senior, who holds a Boxing Union of Ireland licence, hasn't made a wrong call yet.

"David Haye has explosive power, good boxing skills, good movement," he says.

Dangerous

"These are all dangerous 50-50 fights now. Tyson's on a world level. I've said we want the 50-50 fights. David Haye's a world-class fighter and belongs up there in that class. But Tyson's ready. It's Tyson's time."

Peter's son Hughie won super-heavyweight gold at last year's Youth World Amateur Championships. When he turned pro in March his ambition was to fight 15 pro bouts before the end of the year to gain the experience that would see him become the youngest world champion. In Dundalk last Friday he made his record seven unbeaten.

He's in action again on Sunday in Milton Keynes. As he told me after his win against Ivica Perkovic in Dundalk, "I'm only 18 years old and I want to get as many fights as I can. My aim is to be the youngest champion of the world. So far it's going the right path."

Perkovic weighed in at 19st 10lbs. Although a big man, he wasn't a tomato can. He could punch. Fourteen of his 19 wins were by knock-out.

Fury, who's 6' 7", worked behind the jab until the fifth when he unleashed some crippling bodyshots. In pain, the Croatian didn't come out for the sixth.

Despite the win, both Hughie and coach Peter were critical of his performance. Both evaluated the positives and the negatives.

"It was a step up in class from my other opponents," said Hughie. "Some of the opponents he's fought are in the top 10 and they've not stopped him. So it's a good achievement. I kept to the game plan.

"The body shots picked him off," noted Fury. "But in the fifth round I rushed my shots. Every fight is a learning step for me."

Looking on the bright side, Hughie laughed and added: "He's a big puncher. He knocked down (Alexander) Dimitrenko (former EBU champion). I think Dimitrenko hasn't got a chin. I'd like to fight him for sure and show him who's boss."

Later, Peter Fury was clinical in summing up Hughie's performance: "This fellow's a big tough guy who does not get stopped. He's mixed in European-class circles. He's got power as well. For Hughie to get him out of there in five rounds was a spectacular performance. It shows the power Hughie lands to the body. The body shots destroyed him.

"Hughie's learning on the job," added Peter. "Where he made mistakes this time was when he hit him to the body he moved up in a rush to get him out of there. "He deprived himself of a clean KO because Perkovic was gone.

"But Hughie's not had the experience. So he loaded up. When he came back to the corner, he got told off for doing that. Next time, he'll know to pick his shots. And know that a fighter's not gone until he's gone. Basically don't try to rush your work.

"Move over the Klitschkos, the Furys are coming," says Tyson.


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