| -0.5°C Dublin

Ireland's bid to host the 2023 Rugby World Cup to cost €1.5m

Close

Israel Folau, Australia, is tackled by Conor Murray, left, and Peter O'Mahony

Israel Folau, Australia, is tackled by Conor Murray, left, and Peter O'Mahony

Peter O'Mahony, right, is in negotiations over a new Munster and Ireland contract

Peter O'Mahony, right, is in negotiations over a new Munster and Ireland contract

/

Israel Folau, Australia, is tackled by Conor Murray, left, and Peter O'Mahony

IRELAND’s bid to host the 2023 Rugby World Cup will cost an estimated €1.5m according to the IRFU who launched their campaign in Armagh this morning.

The union’s chief executive Philip Browne was joined by Taoiseach Enda Kenny, Tainiste Joan Burton, Northern Ireland First Minister Peter Robinson and Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness at the Royal School, Armagh this morning as both governments threw their full weight behind the bid.

The GAA are also on board and the bid team will work with the association to identify which stadiums will be used and upgraded in line with the requirements of ‘World Rugby’, formerly the IRB.

The bid team will be hoping the cross-border, reconciliation element of the bid will differentiate Ireland from rivals South Africa, Italy and Argentina while Ireland’s close transport links to continental Europe and the UK will also be of benefit.

Staging the tournament itself will cost upwards of E100m, but it would be expected to recoup that fee in tourist revenues with an estimated 350,000 visitors expected to attend.

The Taoiseach believes Ireland’s bid will be “impossible to resist”.

“We have the fans, the stadiums and the accessibility to make it a World Cup to remember,” Mr Kenny said.

“Irish people love their sport, we are passionate about sport and celebrate it. We want to share that experience with the world by inviting the world to Ireland. I’m absolutely confident that Ireland will host the 2023 Rugby World Cup. The government will provide full support.”

IRFU chief Browne thanked both governments for their support, while acknowledging the work done by former international Hugo MacNeill and his working group who have been researching the viability of a bid since February.

“I have no doubt but that Ireland can present a Rugby World Cup which would leave a truly positive and indelible mark on the game,” he said.

The launch marks a first step on a long bidding process that will culminate in mid-2017 and will be decided by ‘World Rugby’.


Privacy