| 11.7°C Dublin

Flat future for Walsh

Close

Un De Sceaux, with Ruby Walsh up, being led into the winners enclosure by owner Edward O'Connell after winning the Red Mills Trial Hurdle. Picture: Barry Cregg /Sportsfile.

Un De Sceaux, with Ruby Walsh up, being led into the winners enclosure by owner Edward O'Connell after winning the Red Mills Trial Hurdle. Picture: Barry Cregg /Sportsfile.

Un De Sceaux, with Ruby Walsh up, being led into the winners enclosure by owner Edward O'Connell after winning the Red Mills Trial Hurdle. Picture: Barry Cregg /Sportsfile.

RUBY WALSH would consider training Flat horses when he retires from the saddle.

The star Irish National Hunt jockey believes it would make more economic sense to snub jumps racing when he eventually calls time on a distinguished riding career.

Walsh, 34, is, however, adamant retirement is not yet even a consideration.

"The lifespan of a jockey has definitely increased in the last 10 years," he said at a sports breakfast in Cork.

"Whereas 34, 35 used to be the norm, it now seems to be 40, so hopefully I've a few more years in me, but if I was to go training horses, I would train Flat horses.

"Flat racing is a business, it's where the money is. Jump racing, unfortunately, is the poor relation. Flat racing is global, worldwide.

"Jump racing is confined between ourselves, England, a small bit in France, a tiny bit in Australia and a little bit in America.

"We were in Japan (for Blackstairmountain's victory in the Nakayama Grand Jump last April), there's big prize-money there, but there's very few races.

"Flat racing is global."


Privacy