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Hawk's impressive debut

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A 'miss' is displayed on the big screen following a decision made as a result of Hawk-Eye being used for the first time at a game in Croke Park. Picture: Diarmuid Greene / SPORTSFILE

A 'miss' is displayed on the big screen following a decision made as a result of Hawk-Eye being used for the first time at a game in Croke Park. Picture: Diarmuid Greene / SPORTSFILE

A 'miss' is displayed on the big screen following a decision made as a result of Hawk-Eye being used for the first time at a game in Croke Park. Picture: Diarmuid Greene / SPORTSFILE

HAWK-EYE made its debut in Croke Park on Saturday evening, the GAA's new score-detection technology was utilised just once over the course of the Leinster SFC double-header in an understated maiden appearance.

And it is Offaly substitute Peter Cunningham who enters trivia lore with the distinction of being the first GAA player to have a shot adjudged upon by Hawk-Eye after his 45th minute effort was deemed too close to call by one of the umpires at the Canal End goals.

The signal was made to referee Rory Hickey indicating that the goalmouth official was unsure as to the ball's trajectory and almost immediately, a virtual replay appeared on the big screen, revealing that the shot had gone outside the post, flashing up a 'Miss' icon for all to see. Hickey signaled a wide, the umpire did likewise and the whole process was complete within 10 seconds.

"I noticed a lot of things but not that," stated a perhaps underwhelmed Kieran McGeeney afterward. "It's a pity we couldn't use Hawk-Eye to solve a lot of our problems out there, but unfortunately we can't."

His opposite number, Emmet McDonnell was slightly more enthusiastic. "It's great to have it," he insisted. "No one wants to lose games through bad decisions, so I'd be happy with that."


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