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Dub star Bernard Brogan in touching Andy Kettle tribute

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Dublin County Board Chairman Andy Kettle

Dublin County Board Chairman Andy Kettle

Dublin's Bernard Brogan, left, and Eoghan O'Gara celebrate with the Sam Maguire cup following their side's All-Ireland victory in 2013, a success that was built on hugely talented footballers supported by a solid financial infrastructure

Dublin's Bernard Brogan, left, and Eoghan O'Gara celebrate with the Sam Maguire cup following their side's All-Ireland victory in 2013, a success that was built on hugely talented footballers supported by a solid financial infrastructure

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Dublin County Board Chairman Andy Kettle

Dublin County Board Chairman Andy Kettle will be laid to rest after a funeral in his local church in Rolestown, North Co Dublin tomorrow.

The ceremony will see dozens of GAA stars turn out at St Brigid's Church for the much-loved father-of-six, who passed away after a battle with cancer on Tuesday.

Meanwhile, GAA stars have been paying their respects to the man in what is being described as "a sad time for Dublin".

Dubs stalwart Bernard Brogan (inset) said that Mr Kettle was always dedicated to his local club, Fingal Ravens, and hailed his record as chairman of the Dublin County Board.

"I think the work that he has put in at grassroots level will be his legacy," he said.

The All-Ireland winning Dublin football star said that he would miss Mr Kettle.

"I was chatting to the lads there on WhatsApp and we were reminiscing about stories. He had great respect from everyone in the dressing room and that's a hard thing to do.

"He was always there on every bus on every away trip, he always had a good joke to tell and he was always good craic," he said.

Former player and current Dublin GAA commercial and marketing manager Mossy Quinn described him as an "enthusiastic" man who would "push to get the very best out of those around him".

"He was similar in the office as he would have been on the pitch, always very enthusiastic and ambitious, and he always wanted what was best not just for the county but also for the Dublin clubs," Mr Quinn said.

"He was a typical GAA man, funny at times and engaging and always great company to be around," he added.

Mr Kettle had survived a bout of prostate cancer 14 years ago and had been in good health since, but a routine check-up in October revealed that it had returned.

infection

His health deteriorated in recent months when a suspected infection turned out to be pneumonia and he had been in intensive care ever since.

Mr Kettle was just re-elected unopposed for his fifth successive year as county chairman on Monday night and was also elected to the Central Council of the GAA.

The 68-year-old is survived by his wife, Phyllis, and children Patrick, Peter, Eoin, Niamh, Orla and Ciara.

hnews@herald.ie


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