| 15.6°C Dublin

Woman who let heroin be kept in her home avoids jail

Close

Gardaí raided house

Gardaí raided house

Gardaí raided house

A woman who allowed her home to be used to store drugs has avoided a jail term.

Veronica O'Connor (41) was not present when the place was raided by gardaí, although two individuals who did not live in the house were there.

O'Connor, of Bunratty Road, Coolock, pleaded guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court to permitting the sale of controlled drugs from her address on February 22, 2017.

She has two convictions for road traffic offences.

Sergeant Janice Gray told the prosecution that on the date in question, gardaí obtained a search warrant for O'Connor's address on foot of confidential information.

The door to the house was barred when they arrived.

Sgt Gray said that when the door was opened, they found two people in the house who did not live there.

O'Connor was found in a car outside the house and had been talking with her brother, having received bags of clothes from him.

Gardaí found heroin worth €2,412 in the kitchen inside a container that would normally contain tea.

They also found 48 diazepam tablets for which the accused took responsibility.

Detox

The prosecution told the court the State's case was that O'Connor was knowingly allowing people to use her home for the supply of heroin.

He said she gave no names as to who these people were, and the State is "not going so far to say" that it was the two people who were in the house when gardaí arrived.

Sgt Gray agreed with the defence that at least one of them would be known to gardaí and is now serving a "fairly lengthy" sentence for a drugs offence.

The sergeant agreed that his client was on methadone, had relapsed back into tak- ing heroin and was trying to detox.

She agreed his client has had a long addiction, but has managed to get "clean" on several occasions.

Judge Martin Nolan said the accused was a woman of a certain age "who should have known better".

He said that while the amount of drugs involved was "serious enough", it was not "too serious" in relation to the amounts that come before the courts.

Judge Nolan said he did not think she deserved a custodial term.

He sentenced O'Connor to two years' imprisonment, but suspended the entirety on condition that she keep the peace and be of good behaviour for two years.


Privacy