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Moynalty in Co Meath has been crowned Ireland's Tidiest Town

Moynalty in Co Meath has been crowned Ireland's Tidiest Town

MADRID, SPAIN - NOVEMBER 06:  A woman walks next to garbage dumped around rubbish bins in the street on November 6, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Street cleaners, garbage collectors and public park gardeners working for Madrid city council started an indefinite strike yesterday which was called by the trade unions. Franchise firms which employ them plan to axe around 1,000 jobs and those who will remain will have to face working for a 40 percent cut of their wages.  (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)

MADRID, SPAIN - NOVEMBER 06: A woman walks next to garbage dumped around rubbish bins in the street on November 6, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Street cleaners, garbage collectors and public park gardeners working for Madrid city council started an indefinite strike yesterday which was called by the trade unions. Franchise firms which employ them plan to axe around 1,000 jobs and those who will remain will have to face working for a 40 percent cut of their wages. (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)

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Moynalty in Co Meath has been crowned Ireland's Tidiest Town

New waste-management plans for Ireland have warned against the country becoming over-dependent on exporting waste.

The amount of municipal waste being exported has increased each year since 2011.

In 2013 more than 300,000 tonnes of waste was exported, approximately 20pc of the available amount in Ireland.

The growth in waste being exported is in part down to the landfill levy which rose from €30 per tonne in 2010 to €75 per tonne in 2013.

This resulted in a drop in the quantity of waste being sent to landfill by almost a third, from 1.5 million tonnes in 2010 to one million tonnes in 2012.

"The continued export of waste results in a direct loss of revenue to the Irish economy and impacts on our ability to reach self-sufficiency," the draft plans stated.

"This loss is compounded by a corresponding reduction in the available waste resource used to generate energy in the form of combined heat and power at many of these overseas facilities."

The regional waste management plans will provide the framework for waste management for the country over the next six years. A public consultation period will run until the end of this month, with the final regional plans to be published by the end of March.

It aims to increase the re-use and recycling rate by up to 70pc within 16 years. It will focus on the recovery of biological waste and wants to see a 1pc reduction per year in the quantity of household waste.

improved

Kevin Swift, regional waste coordinator for the Connacht-Ulster area, said the country had improved significantly in dealing with waste.

"Ireland has improved radically over the last two decades. We've gone from a situation where there were 30 landfills in Ireland 10 years ago. Next year there will only be five, so our dependence on putting things in a hole in the ground is radically reduced," he added.

The new scheme will consist of three regions - Eastern and Midlands, Connacht-Ulster and Southern.

hnews@herald.ie


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