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Trump heading here to renew historic ties and see his golf club

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US President Donald Trump will take up an offer from Taoiseach Leo Varadkar to visit Ireland. Photo: PA

US President Donald Trump will take up an offer from Taoiseach Leo Varadkar to visit Ireland. Photo: PA

US President Donald Trump will take up an offer from Taoiseach Leo Varadkar to visit Ireland. Photo: PA

US President Donald Trump will visit Ireland for two days in November.

It is understood he has acc- epted an invitation issued by Taoiseach Leo Varadkar on St Patrick's Day.

Mr Trump will spend a day in Dublin and one day in Co Clare, where he owns a golf club.

His visit will "renew the deep and historic ties" between the two countries, the White House said.

"The Taoiseach understands that President Trump will stop in Ireland for a brief visit on his way to or from the Armistice commemorations in Paris," said a statement from the Government last night.

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"It will be an opportunity to follow up on the issues discussed in the White House in March including migration, trade, climate change and human rights issues."

In March last year, former Taoiseach Enda Kenny first invited Mr Trump to visit this country.

"I love Ireland. I really love Ireland. I'll be back," Mr Trump said at the time.

He described Mr Kenny as his "new friend" as the two attended the annual Speaker's Lunch in Washington to mark St Patrick's Day.

Then this year, Mr Varadkar re-extended the invitation. This was despite insisting he wouldn't invite the US President if it was his decision back when he was social protection minister.

Mr Varadkar said at the time Ireland's relationship with the US is "much greater" than any one president.

"The invitation that Taoi-seach Enda Kenny made to Donald Trump stands," he said.

"Donald Trump has invited me to Washington DC. I think it is just normal hospitality that when someone invites you to their house, and their country, that you reciprocate."

He also indicated he felt the president would be interested in visiting the Border region, having spoken to him about it during a brief phone call shortly after Mr Varadkar became Taoiseach.

"I know that's something he expressed an interest in when we spoke on the phone some months ago. He was very interested in that," Mr Varadkar said.

Mr Trump has named Ireland specifically when complaining about American jobs and investment going overseas. However, Mr Varadkar has said the area of tax was one he is keen to focus on when he meets the president.

Tanaiste Simon Coveney welcomed the news on Twitter, stating that the US president "is always welcome in Ireland".

"Our two countries have such strong historic, economic, cultural and family ties. Maintaining those connections is always a top priority," he said.

Opposition politicians, including Labour leader Brendan Howlin, have expressed their opposition to a Trump visit.

The Green Party has said it is planning a protest in College Green on November 10, from 11am to 2pm.


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