| 9.8°C Dublin

Teen (17) went on 'crime wave' Proof reptiles first to hit land Space shuttle workers cut Jacko doctors face no charge

A 17-year-old boy, who believed that drink spiked with drugs resulted in him taking part in a crime wave, has been given a four-month suspended sentence.

The boy had pleaded guilty at the Children's Court to theft, trespass, obstructing a garda and criminal damage offences which occurred at the Poppintree Industrial Estate on July 17 last year.

Garda Garvan Lennon had said that the teenager trespassed at the estate, stole a bicycle there, then used a bolt cutters to cut through a fence causing damages costing around €500.



Proof reptiles first to hit land

Researchers today announced proof that reptiles were the first vertebrates to conquer dry land with the discovery of 318-million-year-old footprints in Canada.

The discovery proves that reptiles were the first to make continental interiors their home, because they do not need to return to water to breed, unlike amphibians.

The rocks in which these prints occur show that the reptiles lived on dry river plains, hundreds of miles from the sea.



Space shuttle workers cut

United Space Alliance, the private contractor that handles Nasa's space shuttle fleet, is notifying 1,400 employees that they will be laid off in the autumn in the lead-up to the shuttle programme's winding down.

The programme now employs about 8,700 contractors, down from 12,000 employees in October 2008.

It also employs another 1,200 civil workers, who are expected to be assigned to new programmes after the shuttle.

The last shuttle flight is expected next year.



Jacko doctors face no charge

US investigators probing the death of Michael Jackson decided not to file charges against seven doctors who treated him, authorities said.

One doctor whose name was not released was referred to the California Medical Board for prescribing drugs to a Jackson alias.

Jackson's personal doctor, Conrad Murray, was not among the seven doctors involved in the state investigation.


Privacy