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Tat's the way to do it - OAPs get the needle for charity

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Dolores Waller (65) from Louth ,Lily Barnacle (74) from Dundalk, Mick McCarthy (68) from Kilmainham , Tom McArdle (66) and Rita Ashe (65) from Artane who all got a inked in aid of Alone to fight Ageism at the Ink Factory in Dublin.

Dolores Waller (65) from Louth ,Lily Barnacle (74) from Dundalk, Mick McCarthy (68) from Kilmainham , Tom McArdle (66) and Rita Ashe (65) from Artane who all got a inked in aid of Alone to fight Ageism at the Ink Factory in Dublin.

Dolores Waller (65) from Louth ,Lily Barnacle (74) from Dundalk, Mick McCarthy (68) from Kilmainham , Tom McArdle (66) and Rita Ashe (65) from Artane who all got a inked in aid of Alone to fight Ageism at the Ink Factory in Dublin.

A charity and a popular Dublin tattoo parlour have joined forces to ink five elderly people with tattoos.

Alone, the charity that supports older people at home, has joined up with The Ink Factory for a campaign called The Bucket Listers.

Five elderly people went under the needle yesterday, getting tattoos that described them best.

Dolores Waller (65) and Lily Barnacle (74), who sing in an Alone choir in Dundalk, got tattoos to honour loved ones.

Ms Waller's tattoo features a heart and the name Michelle, which will remind her of her godchild.

"My goddaughter Michelle died in very sad circumstances, by suicide," she said.

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Mick McCarthy shows off his tattoo

Mick McCarthy shows off his tattoo

Mick McCarthy shows off his tattoo

"She suffered from depression and could see no way out.

"It happened in 1999, but the pain of our loss has never gotten any easier.

"This tattoo is going to remind me of Michelle, it'll keep her closer. I felt like she was more or less like my own daughter."

The initiative is part of a larger umbrella campaign that seeks to fight the stigma around ageing while simultaneously raising funds and awareness around the work Alone does.

Mick McCarthy (69) applied for Alone housing in 2016 after struggling to keep up with costs after retirement.

"In the recession I lost my home, but thankfully my daughter got me in touch with Alone, who took it from there and helped me out enormously," he said.

Happier

"If it wasn't for them I would be homeless and now I couldn't be happier."

Mr McCarthy's Once A Hoop, Always A Hoop tattoo refers to his love for Shamrock Rovers.

"I owe a lot to my very close friends in Shamrock Rovers, who have helped me enormously through very tough times," he said.

"There are no words I can say to thank them - they were there for me, just like Alone."

Alone chief executive Sean Moynihan said he was "delighted to see the enthusiasm" from everyone involved in the project.


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