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Second storm on way after Diana brings blackouts and travel chaos

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Two walkers look back as the Poolbeg Lighthouse disappears behind the high seas and waves created by Storm Diana on Dublins South Wall. Photo: Eamonn Farrell/RollingNews.ie

Two walkers look back as the Poolbeg Lighthouse disappears behind the high seas and waves created by Storm Diana on Dublins South Wall. Photo: Eamonn Farrell/RollingNews.ie

Two walkers look back as the Poolbeg Lighthouse disappears behind the high seas and waves created by Storm Diana on Dublins South Wall. Photo: Eamonn Farrell/RollingNews.ie

Another storm could soon hit our shores after Diana caused significant disruption on ports, airports and roads.

Nearly 40,000 people were left without power as fallen trees damaged electricity supply lines.

ESB crews were working last night to restore power to households and businesses. Worst hit were counties Kilkenny, Kildare and Cork.

Coastal counties avoided major damage as the storm proved less destructive than initially feared, with a status orange warning in place.

Fourteen flights were cancelled at Cork Airport yesterday morning because of strong winds.

At Sherkin Island in west Cork, gusts of up to 122kph were recorded - the highest in the country. The worst of the power cuts happened in Kilkenny, where around 8,000 homes lost their supply because of fallen trees and damaged lines. In Kildare, 3,000 homes lost power.

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Stormy weather on Dublin's Talbot Street

Stormy weather on Dublin's Talbot Street

Stormy weather on Dublin's Talbot Street

Surge

In Galway, the Salthill promenade was closed due to high winds and seas. Some coastal areas experienced a tidal surge of nearly 75cm.

A second Atlantic storm is expected within 24 hours.

However, while it has the potential to generate damaging gusts, the worst of the weather is expected to make landfall over southern England.

Meanwhile, the owners of a luxury apartment complex where homes will cost up to €3,300 a month to rent have insisted no damage has been caused to the building following a water leak.

Engineers are assessing possible damage to floors, ceilings and electrical systems at the 22-storey Capital Dock development in the Dublin Docklands after a valve on a pressurised water pipe at the Hailing Station building failed.

Water ran from the pipe for about 20 minutes before being switched off.

"The apartments and all amenities are unaffected as the water ran down the enclosed riser," a spokesman for the building owners said. "The leak was addressed immediately and all the water has been removed, with the affected commons areas all drying out."

He said apartment events planned for next month, as well as move-in dates, would not be affected.


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