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Rat plague alert as rubbish piles up around city

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Herald Reporter Cormack Murphy points to the dumped household waste in Summerhill. Photo: Garrett White

Herald Reporter Cormack Murphy points to the dumped household waste in Summerhill. Photo: Garrett White

Herald Reporter Cormack Murphy points to the dumped household waste in Summerhill. Photo: Garrett White

CLAIMS that rat infestation is rife in areas of illegal dumping are being investigated by Dublin City Council.

Areas of inner city Dublin are plagued with growing piles of rubbish amid allegations that some residents are illegally disposing of their household waste in public areas.

The knock-on effect of this could be disastrous for public health and reports of extra rat activity levels are being investigated by the council.

Rats are carriers of lethal infections, including Weil's disease, which is transferred from the urine of rats and can develop as a flu-like illness.

Residents must now prove that they are paying for waste disposal in the north city centre area due to the build-up of illegal dumping of household waste.

Senior executive officer with the city council Brendan Hayden identified at a meeting of the Central Area Committee, that all residents are being written to and being asked to prove how they dispose of waste and which company they use.

 

Problems

Council tenants are required to do this as part of their tenancy agreement.

Private households are also legally obliged under the Waste Management Act. The council's environmental health officers are now clamping down on multi-rental units particularly in the North Circular Road area.

And they will also check compliance with housing regulations are also asking landlords to show waste storage areas.

The council is also carrying out a poster campaign in a number of litter blackspots in the north city area.

A Dublin City Council representative told the Herald that the measures are in addition to litter wardens, whose duty is to try to find out who is illegally dumping and it is their job to summons individuals to court and/or fine.

The Herald earlier revealed how there was a plan to let rubbish pile up in Dublin city to highlight the extent of the problem – but this was halted due to fears that it could become a public health threat.

The problem is particularly bad in the north inner city areas of Summerhill and Ballybough.

Now the council is investigating if there are rat problems in these areas due to illegal dumping.

A council waste management truck currently visits the area daily – but Dublin City Council wants to reduce this to once every seven days.

The problem is that residents who are "legitimately paying" for their rubbish collection are frustrated that their neighbours are effectively getting a free collection, city official Brendan Hayden said.

Most of the severe problems are being experienced in the north inner city.

clairemurphy@herald.ie


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