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Politicians cut down to size in poster rules

DUBLINERS will no longer have to put up with oversized pictures of politicians on lampposts – outside of election time at least.

Dublin City Council has drawn up revised rules for public notices stipulating that the text must take up 75pc of any poster.

It means pictures will be restricted to the remaining 25pc. The condition has been included in an updated protocol for posters which is to come before city councillors for approval.

However, the rules don't apply to election placards erected ahead of polling day.

The protocol, first introduced in 2007, allows for flyers to be posted up around the city advertising meetings or events.

But since then, the council has come across many instances where the details of the meeting are dwarfed by a photo or political message.

It was felt some notices were effectively advertising a politician, rather than an event.

The revised guidelines state: "The poster must have at a minimum 75pc of the poster layout detailing the details of the meeting and this content must be clearly visible to members of the public."

APPLICATIONS

Further changes limit the number of notices to 500 in respect of each event.

"The protocol has worked extremely well in controlling postering within the city and there has been practically full co-operation from most organisations," local authority official Hugh Coughlan said.

He said the council has received 750 applications to put up posters since the protocol was introduced.

Speaking previously, Mr Coughlan said that, on some notices, the meeting details were at times "barely legible" and the council received queries "about the true purpose of the poster".

The existing rules also specify that the local authority can refuse permission for vulgar or offensive ads, though the criteria are not set out.

Consideration was also given to expanding the number of streets on which public notices were banned altogether. They are prohibited on Grafton Street, Henry Street and O'Connell Street at all times.

comurphy@herald.ie


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