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Once he ran with the Corballys, how Deero became their enemy

DRUGSLORD, Deero once worked alongside the Corballys in the infamous M50 gang. Then he became their deadliest foe.

The unpredictable and volatile west Dublin gangster became a heavy-hitter in the drug business after he took over the territory vacated by George Mitchell, aka The Penguin, and John Gilligan in the late 1990s.

He had been associated with both men before they were forced off the Dublin drugs scene -- Gilligan to jail and Mitchell to the Netherlands.

While the Corballys fled to Manchester and formed bonds with drug baron Seanie Comerford, the Deero, the self styled 'Boss of Ballyfermot' was forming his own drugs empire in west Dublin.

He consolidated his power through violence, and has amassed convictions ranging from assault to larceny and bribery.

He cleverly has avoided detection for his drug activity and has no convictions, but a lot of his associates have served time.

Deero used a caravan in a halting site in West Dublin as a base to ship heroin around the city.

His theory is that it would take half the garda force in Dublin in full riot gear to get at him in the encampment. He was as safe as Fort Knox in there.

He was there with the permission of Traveller mob boss, the Wasp. But Deero's drug dealing in their backyard was despised by ordinary members of the Travelling community, helpless in the face of the Wasp's violent reputation.

Deero is also known for his close connections in the legal community - perhaps part of the reason he has avoided the long arm of the law for so long.

Known and feared in the local area, Deero has long been a major target of the National Drugs Unit.



Mistake

At one stage in the 1990s, he skipped Ireland and escaped to Portugal, fearing arrest.

The drug lord was given a suspended sentence for what was described as an "inherently sinister, suspicious, dark and mysterious" assault on another man.

The Corbally brothers, Seanie Comerford and Deero all ran their Ballyfermot drugs operation without any tension for years.

But that all changed after a fatal brawl in a pub carpark last September.

The Park West bloodbath occurred on September 27 last year on Park West Road when associates of Seanie Comerford and the Corballys clashed with Deero in a brawl using bottles, broken glass, hurleys, knives -- one man was even seen wielding a hatchet by eyewitnesses.

Deero himself is thought to have suffered minor injuries in the brawl.

Then he survived an attempt on his life six weeks ago in west Dublin which the Corballys are believed to have been behind. Armed men chased but failed to shoot him on this occasion.

Now Deero too is lying low since the murder of his hated foes, the Corballys, amid fears of reprisals.

hnews@herald.ie


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