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Murderer Dumbrell stages 'dirty' protest over prison transfer

Ireland's most notorious prisoner Warren Dumbrell is currently involved in a dirty protest at the Midlands Prison -- after he objected to being transferred there from another jail.

Dumbrell (36) is serving a life sentence for the murder of father-of-six Christopher Cawley in Inchicore five years ago.

Dumbrell has spent most of his life behind bars and the dirty protest is just his latest incident in which the feared thug from Dublin's south inner city has been involved.

A jail insider told the Herald: "This protest started on Friday when Warren Dumbrell was transferred back to the Midlands Prison from Cork Prison.

"He had been sent to Cork Prison for a few weeks after he threatened a prison officer in the Midlands. It seemed he liked it down there because he went absolutely mental when he was sent back to the Midlands.



Disgusting

"Dumbrell has smeared his own cell with his excrement and has even written the word 'Cork' on the wall of his cell with the excrement.

"His filthy protest is causing huge problems for prison staff and other prisoners -- it is absolutely disgusting."

Psychopath Warren and his younger brother Jeffrey are serving life for stabbing and beating Mr Cawley to death in an attack in front of his wife and three of his children.

Warren Dumbrell gained notoriety when he led a gang that held five prison officers hostage during a riot in Mountjoy in 1997. He held a blood-filled syringe to an officer's throat, claiming he had "the virus" and threatened to inject him with it.

"I have the virus since I was 15 years old. I don't give a f***, I'll make you drink my blood," he told the officer.

He also threatened to "slaughter and slash" prison officers and kill one "every 20 minutes".

Dumbrell received a 10-year sentence for his part in the siege which lasted for 53 hours and he murdered Mr Cawley two months after his early release from prison in August 2006.

He is considered so dangerous that three prison officers accompany him every time he leaves his cell as he is considered a major security risk.

He has 26 criminal convictions for murder, assault, robbery, burglary and possession of firearms. His first was in 1987 for burglary when he was aged just 13.

hnews@herald.ie


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