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Metro North may be back on for north Dublin

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Artists designs for Metro North stations

Artists designs for Metro North stations

Hopes are high that the DART will be extended to Balbriggan in the coming years

Hopes are high that the DART will be extended to Balbriggan in the coming years

Aoife Heron was travelling from Connolly Station to Jervis Street in Dublin when the accident happened.

Aoife Heron was travelling from Connolly Station to Jervis Street in Dublin when the accident happened.

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Artists designs for Metro North stations

SIX major transport schemes have been unveiled as possible solutions to cater for growing population growth in north Dublin.

The shelved Metro North project is back on the agenda, along with a partially-tunnelled Line line,  two extensions of the DART network and bus rapid transit, where buses travel on dedicated road space, segregated from other traffic.

But not until next year will a decision be made on the winning project.

Consultants will not evaluate the merits of each, and provided detailed costings before a decision is made.

The options are:

• A DART link from Clongriffin to the airport and Swords.

• A DART link from the Maynooth Railway Line to the airport and Swords via a tunnel under Glasnevin.;

• A Luas line from Cabra to the airport and Swords via a tunnel under Glasnevin

• Metro North proposal from St. Stephen’s Green to the Airport and Swords

• A bus rapid transit option, encompassing three separate lines and

• A combination of a DART link from and Clongriffin to the Airport and a Luas line from Cabra to Swords.

The schemes were published by Transport Minister Paschal Donohoe this afternoon, and are out for public consultation until January 19 next. Details are at www.nationaltransport.ie.

A total of 25 public transport schemes were identified and assessed, which has now been whittled down to six.

“The Fingal area is one of the fastest growing areas in the country,” Mr Donohoe said. “Failure to put appropriate plans in place now to meet the long-term transport needs of this area, will mean increased congestion down the line which will ultimately threaten our future economic development.

“I urge people to make their views known, through the NTA, so that they can be considered as we move to the next stage and an optimum public transport solution for the Greater North Dublin area.”

Chief executive of the National Transport Authority, Gerry Murphy, said that detailed costings and assessment would take place, and that it was important that the best value-for-money was achieved.

“We have carried out a very comprehensive exercise in looking at a wide spectrum of project options and we will now evaluate the most appropriate six projects in even greater detail. The objective is to find the project that best meets the needs on a value for money basis of such an important area of the Dublin region.”


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