| 9.6°C Dublin

'Loss of control' to blame for Cork air crash that killed six

Close

The plane after it crashed at Cork airport in 2011. Photo: PA

The plane after it crashed at Cork airport in 2011. Photo: PA

The plane after it crashed at Cork airport in 2011. Photo: PA

THE Manx2.com crash at Cork Airport in which six people died was caused by a disastrous "loss of control during an attempted go-around".

The Department of Transport's elite Air Accident Investigation Unit (AAIU) today published their report into the tragedy just two weeks before the third anniversary of the accident.

INJURIES

Six people died and six survived, four with severe injuries, when the US-built Fairchild turboprop crashed and caught fire while attempting to land at Cork Airport in February 2011 during thick fog.

The AAIU report said there were: "Systemic deficiencies at the operational, organisational and regulatory levels, such deficiencies included pilot training, scheduling of flight crews, maintenance and inadequate oversight of the operation by the Operator and the State of Registration."

It found nine major factors caused the tragedy including:

* The approach was continued in conditions of poor visibility below those required

* The descent was continued below the decision height without adequate visual reference

* Uncoordinated operation of the flight and engine controls when go-around was attempted

* The engine power-levers were below the normal in-flight operational range – an action prohibited in flight

* A power difference between the engines became significant when the engine power levers were retarded below the normal in-flight range

* Crew tiredness and fatigue

* Inadequate command training and checking

* Inappropriate pairing of flight crew members

* Inadequate operator and State oversight body involved.

The painstaking AAIU investigation focussed on why the aircrew attempted a third landing instead of diverting to another airport, the precise weather and visibility at the time as well as the mechanics of the 19-year-old US-built turboprop aircraft.

hnews@herald.ie


Privacy