| 5.2°C Dublin

Losing our Metro stop is a small price to save pitches, say supporters

Close

Aileen McDowell (left), Lisa Martin and Kay O’Sullivan, all from Glasnevin, watching Na Fianna minors on home soil

Aileen McDowell (left), Lisa Martin and Kay O’Sullivan, all from Glasnevin, watching Na Fianna minors on home soil

Aileen McDowell (left), Lisa Martin and Kay O’Sullivan, all from Glasnevin, watching Na Fianna minors on home soil

Club members at Na Fianna GAA say losing a Metro stop is a small price to pay if it means saving their playing pitches from destruction.

The Herald recently revealed that the Glasnevin pitches are no longer being considered as a tunnelling site for the proposed MetroLink.

The original plans would have seen Na Fianna GAA, one of the largest clubs in Ireland, lose its main pitch on Mobhi Road and two all-weather pitches for up to six years.

It would have also caused major disruption for schools in the area.

Opposition

But following widespread opposition, a new proposal will see a stop constructed beneath nearby Home Farm's pitch. It will take 18 months to build.

Yesterday, the Herald talked to spectators and club members at Na Fianna GAA to see what they thought about the new proposal.

"It's obviously great news for the club and surrounding area," said Glasnevin resident and club member Derek Walsh.

"Hundreds, if not thousands, of kids use these pitches and it would have been a terrible shame to lose them.

"Although nothing is confirmed, it seems the National Transport Authority is starting to take our concerns on board.

"To be honest, losing a station is nothing compared to the damage that would have been caused during the construction phase of the Metro.

"It was a ridiculous proposal to start with and I hope there are no more nasty surprises to come."

Kim Hayes, who was supporting her son at yesterday's under-18s match between Na Fianna and Cuala, said the news came as a massive relief to families in the area.

"These pitches are really the heart of so many communities in north Dublin, including Glasnevin, Drumcondra and Phibsboro," she said.

"It wasn't a surprise there was so much opposition because a tunnel boring machine on the land would mean that our pitch would be out of use for a very long time.

"This club caters for about 130 teams and is constantly utilised by so many children and young people."

Aileen McDowell, from Glasnevin, said she remained cautious as the NTA hasn't updated the club yet.

"I'm optimistic but we have not been given any official confirmation yet," she said. "We're one of the biggest clubs in the country so we're all hoping they take another direction."

Na Fianna spokesman Cormac O'Sullivan told the Herald that he won't comment until the club receives formal notice of the new proposal.


Privacy