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Hungry bears turn to thieving

Without their usual diet of berries and nuts as hibernation approaches, bears in the western United States are turning to cars and cabins. Huckleberries, nuts and pine cones are in short supply this year because of poor growing conditions, so bears have taken to breaking into cars, nosing around backyards and raiding orchards.

Huckleberries, nuts and pine cones are in short supply this year because of poor growing conditions, so bears have taken to breaking into cars, nosing around backyards and raiding orchards.

And as happens when bears roam into towns, they end up trapped or dead. In New Mexico, 83 bears have been killed so far this year. Wildlife officials from the Pacific Northwest have traveled to New Mexico and are advising people to put away bird feed and bin rubbish.



Bid to reveal Nixon answers

Thirty-five years after Richard Nixon testified secretly to a grand jury investigating Watergate, historians are making a legal bid to make public what the US president said under oath about the break-in that drove him from office.

Nixon was interviewed for 11 hours on June 23-24, 1975, 10 months after he resigned.

The historians have filed a petition before Chief Judge Royce Lamberth of US District Court in Washington arguing the historical significance outweighs arguments for secrecy with Nixon dead for 16 years.



UN supports Sudan ballot

The UN Security Council says it backs the creation of a panel to monitor voting that may determine whether Sudan's south secedes, and who wins the tug-of-war over the central oil-rich region of Abyei.

The 15-member body said in a news release that secretary general Ban Ki-moon hopes to create the panel at the request of the Sudanese government and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement.

It also says it is calling on all parties to ensure that balloting planned for January is held on time, and that electoral results are respected.



School trouble over nude pics

A Pennsylvania school district has settled a lawsuit alleging that a head teacher illegally searched a student's mobile phone, found nude pictures she had taken of herself and turned it over to prosecutors.

The Tunkhannock Area School District denied any wrongdoing, but agreed to pay the student and her lawyers $33,000 (£25,400) to settle the case.


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