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Historic milestone as GAA celebrates 100 magical years at field of dreams

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 HALLOWED TURF: From left, Peter McKenna, Croke Park director, David Dineen, GAA President Liam Ó Neill and GAA Director General Paraic Duffy holding the original deeds of Croke Park presented to the GAA by Frank Dinan (middle right). Photo: Sportsfile

HALLOWED TURF: From left, Peter McKenna, Croke Park director, David Dineen, GAA President Liam Ó Neill and GAA Director General Paraic Duffy holding the original deeds of Croke Park presented to the GAA by Frank Dinan (middle right). Photo: Sportsfile

HALLOWED TURF: From left, Peter McKenna, Croke Park director, David Dineen, GAA President Liam Ó Neill and GAA Director General Paraic Duffy holding the original deeds of Croke Park presented to the GAA by Frank Dinan (middle right). Photo: Sportsfile

IT is one of the country's most revered landmarks and is this week celebrating 100 years in the hands of the GAA.

Croke Park was presented to the country's largest sporting organisation by Frank Brazil Dineen on December 18, 1913.

Yesterday, members of the Dineen family were presented with framed copies of the original deeds to the stadium by GAA President Liam O'Neill at the hallowed ground.

"The GAA and Croke Park are synonymous with each other to such an extent that it is almost impossible to imagine one without the other," Mr O'Neill said.

Since the stadium was officially named Croke Memorial Park (later simply Croke Park), the names of hurling and football legends – such as Mick Mackey, Christy Ring, Mikey Sheehy, Henry Shefflin and Bernard Brogan – have enthralled the nation every year at the venue.

ICONIC

"Today is a hugely important milestone in the history of the Association and one on which we are proud to shine a light on the all important contribution of Frank Brazil Dineen," he added.

"Not only did he serve as both president and general secretary of a then fledgling organisation, but he personally secured what would become the long-term iconic home of the GAA. For that amongst others things we should be eternally grateful," Mr O'Neill said.

Dineen bought the Jones Road site, which was a 14-acre racecourse in 1908, for £3,205 to provide the country's hurlers and footballers with an official home.Following the sale of the grounds to the GAA, Dineen remained involved in the GAA until his death in 1916.

In 2006, Hill 16 was officially re-named Dineen Hill 16 in honour of Frank Dineen.

hnews@herald.ie


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