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Hat-trick of awards for Irish film stars in London

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Brendan Gleeson arrives at the Moet British Independent Film Awards, at Old Billingsgate, London

Brendan Gleeson arrives at the Moet British Independent Film Awards, at Old Billingsgate, London

Brendan Gleeson arrives at the Moet British Independent Film Awards, at Old Billingsgate, London

TWO Irish stars scooped the top acting gongs at the British Independent Film Awards last night.

Brendan Gleeson won the best actor award for his role as Fr James Lavelle in comic-drama Calvary at the London ceremony, and the 59-year-old was on hand to pick up the gleaming Swarovski trophy.

Meanwhile, rising star Dubliner Andrew Scott collected the best supporting actor award for his appearance in Pride this year, co-starring with The Wire actor Dominic West in the film about gay activists involved in a miners' strike in the 1980s.

The award capped a good week for 38-year-old Scott, who featured with Bond actor Daniel Craig days earlier at the announcement of the new 007 film Spectre.

Scott, who made his name playing Moriarty on the hit show Sherlock, will appear as a character called Denbigh - believed to be a top MI6 official.

Scott's film Pride also won the best independent British film award.

His recently-engaged Sherlock co-star Benedict Cumberbatch was honoured with the Variety Award for his work in shining the "international spotlight on the UK".

outstanding

Also honoured last night was legendary Irish-based director John Boorman, who was awarded the special jury prize.

The 17th annual ceremony was hosted by Simon Bird of The Inbetweeners fame, with Emma Thompson winning the 'Richard Harris Award' for her outstanding contribution to the industry.

Irish director Lenny Abrahmson missed out on the best director award after receiving a nomination for Frank, and John Michael McDonagh had been nominated in the same category for Calvary.

McDonagh caused controversy here earlier in the year when he said he did not want Calvary to be considered "an Irish film" because he did not find Irish movies to be "technically that accomplished" or "intelligent".

hnews@herald.ie


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