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Gangster Wayne Bradley caught breaking jail release terms

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Wayne Bradley

Wayne Bradley

Wayne Bradley at Ratoath Road, Finglas

Wayne Bradley at Ratoath Road, Finglas

Wayne Bradley at Ratoath Road, Finglas

Wayne Bradley at Ratoath Road, Finglas

Wayne Bradley and brother Alan

Wayne Bradley and brother Alan

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Wayne Bradley

GANGLAND criminal Wayne Bradley has been caught in the act again, this time breaking the terms of his temporary release from Mountjoy Prison - visiting his home and taking a car for a spin.

Bradley (35) is serving a five-year sentence for his part in a €900,000 cash-in-transit robbery - during which he and his cronies were caught red-handed by gardai.

Now, our exclusive photos show Bradley hanging around outside his home in Finglas, north Dublin, before driving off in a Peugeot car, all in breach of his temporary-release conditions.

MOBILE

The Herald can also reveal that Bradley - the younger brother of gangster Alan 'Fatpuss' Bradley - has been using an illegal mobile phone behind bars to update his Facebook page.

Bradley was moved to the training unit in Mountjoy Prison in September and he has been given temporary release on weekdays to pursue a HGV driving course before returning to the jail at night.

However, as an inmate, he is not allowed to drive a car or use his time off to spend at his home, both of which the brazen criminal did yesterday.

Bradley, wearing a blue hoodie, first emerged from the front door of the property on Ratoath Road at about 8.20am, walking to the black Puegeot and taking a bag from the car.

He returned inside the house, which has a handsomely-decorated Christmas tree in the front room, before emerging again 10 minutes later wearing a black jacket over the blue top.

He got into the car and drove off to an unknown destination.

Jail sources said last night that his temporary release conditions are now suspended pending a prison investigation into the revelation that he has been breaking the regulations.

Gardai said they were shocked by the development.

"You spend years trying to get this thug locked up and he finally gets jailed and the next thing you see him hanging out like he has not a care in the world. Some country we live in," a garda source said.

Meanwhile, it can also be revealed that Bradley has been using a mobile phone behind bars and has been regularly updating his Facebook profile.

His profile on the social networking site is a photograph of Walter White, the fictional drug-dealing star of the hit series Breaking Bad.

Sources have questioned why Bradley has been placed in the relatively-cushy regime at Mountjoy Prison's Training Unit where he is allowed out almost every day, despite the extremely serious nature of what he was convicted of and his gangland credentials.

"There is something really weird going on here, he is being treated like he is a middle-class fraud criminal or something," the source said.

Wayne Bradley was a junior member of the notorious gang led by slain crimelord Eamon 'The Don' Dunne.

Wayne and his brother 'Fatpuss', who is doing his time in high-security Portlaoise Prison, tried to carry out a raid on a cash-in-transit van carrying almost €900,000 in 2007 under the direction of 'The Don'.

However, the Garda Organised Crime Unit were lying in wait at the Tesco Store at Celbridge, Co Kildare and the keys the gang had to open the van did not work.

DETAINED

Officers arrested them before any money was taken and Dunne was also detained at the scene.

Gangland chief Dunne was later shot dead at a pub in Fassaugh Avenue, Cabra, North Dublin, on April 23, 2010.

Three other men were also sentenced for their roles in the heist, including Chubb Ireland employee Darryl Caffrey, who acted as an inside man.

During the court case, Det Gda Ronan Casey said Alan Bradley was second-in-command to Dunne.

Lookout Wayne Bradley did not participate in the planning of the raid.

In July, the brothers had their sentences for conspiring to steal from a cash-in-transit van reduced by six months on appeal.

kfoy@herald.ie


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