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Families without water for five weeks and no solution in sight

DOZENS of families in a Dublin housing complex are now without any water for five weeks.

And residents on the top balconies of the Pearse Street flats say there is no end in sight to the problem because Dublin City Council still hasn't told them why they haven't restored normal service.

The 78 homes lost their water supply around New Year and have been buying water and relying on neighbours since.

While the top balconies in the complex have no water during daytime hours, people living below them have an adequate service.

The supply is active in the very early hours of the morning, meaning the only opportunity the residents have to fill bottles is around 3am.

One local, Anne Reilly, told the Herald: "We've no toilet, no shower and no washing machine. It's disgusting, I'm fuming."

She said that her husband regularly gets up at 3.30am to fill a basin with enough water to use in the morning.

"My daughter lives downstairs so I've been getting water off her and buying it.

"I rang the civic offices and they said they didn't know anything about it," she said.

Officials from the Council have visited the complex in recent days but they have not offered a solution or timeframe for the restoration of a normal service.

"One chap said that it's possible there is a burst pipe but others said it's because they've lowered the pressure," she explained.



unacceptable

She added that at least two of her neighbours have moved out because they couldn't cope with the problem any longer.

"The girl in the next block has a two-month-old baby. How is she supposed to do feeds?" she said.

Local TD Chris Andrews, who has been canvassing the Council on their behalf, said: "It just seems unacceptable that Dublin City Council can leave people for more than five weeks without water and further compound the problem by giving no indication of when it will be solved. That's really not on."

He added: "There are families, kids, older people, people with medical needs all living here. People in 2010 shouldn't be left five weeks without water."

Dublin City Council told the Herald that the problem was "connected to the water crisis in the wider city". A spokesperson said that investigations yesterday uncovered a burst pipe and that it would be fixed "sooner rather than later".

All four local authorities in Dublin are still appealing to people to cutback on their water usage, while workers attempt to repair leaks.

South Dublin County Council says that there are no longer any burst pipes on its drinking water network, but crews are undertaking routine maintenance works.

kdoyle@herald.ie


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