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Sean's firm battles Nokia over offices 'cold as Arctic'

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Ex-Presidential candidate Sean Gallagher outside court. Photo: Collins

Ex-Presidential candidate Sean Gallagher outside court. Photo: Collins

Ex-Presidential candidate Sean Gallagher outside court. Photo: Collins

A dispute between a property company of former presidential candidate Sean Gallagher and Nokia Ireland has come before the High Court.

Nokia Ireland is seeking various orders against its landlord, Clyde Real Estate Blanchardstown, in a dispute over heating and cooling systems for a Dublin premises.

The application opened yesterday, when Ms Justice Teresa Pilkington heard claims by Nokia that conditions in its office, where 100 people work, were described as "Arctic" and difficult to work in due to the alleged failure to provide proper heating services.

In a sworn statement, Mr Gallagher, the chief executive of Clyde Real Estate, disputed this and said that the temperatures in the office had been recorded by experts as being acceptable for an office, pending the installation of a replacement heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system in January.

Breach

Nokia says it had complained about excessively hot and cold temperatures since 2016.

The communications firm initiated proceedings in June, when Ireland was experiencing a heatwave, claiming Clyde was in breach of a lease agreement of March 2015.

Opening the case, Michael Howard, for Nokia, said his client's workers had been enduring office temperatures far below the accepted 18-23C.

On dates in October and early November, counsel said, workers were sharing portable heaters to stay warm, and had to wear their jackets indoors.

His client does not accept Clyde's claims that the new HVAC system will be up and running early in the New Year.

Clyde does not dispute its responsibility to provide a HVAC system, and said it will replace the current one in January.

It claims that under a proper construction of the lease agreement, the electricity and gas consumed in operating an HVAC was the responsibility of Nokia as a tenant. Nokia disputes this.

The hearing continues.


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