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Man with cocaine at gig had 'bowed to peer pressure'

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Gardai said Zak Seager was ‘uneasy and fidgeting’

Gardai said Zak Seager was ‘uneasy and fidgeting’

Gardai said Zak Seager was ‘uneasy and fidgeting’

A father-of-two caught with €100 worth of cocaine while attending Noel Gallagher's concert at Malahide Castle last summer claimed he "bowed to peer pressure".

Zak Seager (34) said he was not a habitual user of the drug, but on the day he "got in with others" and gave in to peer pressure.

Judge Dermot Dempsey said: "It's idiots like him who are supporting the drugs industry.

"You should be ashamed of yourself."

Swords District Court heard gardai stopped the accused on his way into the concert at the castle as he was "uneasy and fidgeting".

He was searched and cocaine was found. He accepted ownership of the drugs.

The defendant, of Willowbrook Park, Celbridge, pleaded guilty to being in unlawful possession of cocaine last June 16 under Section 3 of the Misuse of Drugs Act.

He had no previous convictions.

Anxious

The defendant's solicitor said he had apologised to gardai for taking up their time.

"He is anxious to plead guilty," the solicitor said, adding that Seager had a good job.

"He was at the Noel Galla- gher concert and got in with other people and bowed to peer pressure."

On hearing this, the judge said: "Peer pressure at 34? Does he know what he is supporting, having the drugs?

"He has two young kids. What does he do in 10 years' time when they're going to gigs?

"It's idiots like him who are supporting the drugs industry."

The solicitor said: "He is holding his head in shame and is asking for the mercy of the court."

He added that the defendant had €500 to offer to charity if the court left him without a conviction.

Judge Dempsey said that was "not sufficient for the amount of cocaine involved".

The defendant came up with €750 the following day and Judge Dempsey allocated it to Merchants Quay Ireland, striking out the case and leaving Seager without a conviction.


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