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Hit-and-run mum weeps as she's jailed

A MOTHER-of-one has been jailed for three months for a hit-and-run accident in which she knocked down and injured a young man outside a pub before fleeing the scene.

Gemma Murray (23) had been drinking and arguing with her mother when she took her father's car and struck the pedestrian, then drove off, crashed and abandoned the vehicle.

A court heard that before gardai caught up with her, she went to the hospital and apologised to the victim as he was being treated for a broken shoulder and ribs.

Judge David McHugh said both Murray and the victim were lucky to escape with their lives. As well as the three-month sentence, he fined her €1,000 and gave her concurrent two-year driving bans. Murray, of Ratoath Drive, Finglas, pleaded guilty to failing to stop after causing injury to the victim on September 8, 2012. She also admitted two counts of dangerous driving as well as having no insurance or licence.

Sgt Maria O'Callaghan told Blanchardstown District Court that gardai saw the car driving at speed at Cardiffsbridge Road, Finglas.

CRASHED

There were people outside the Cardiff Inn and a short distance up the road, Murray collided with Anthony McDonagh, a pedestrian.

Murray was seen losing control of the car at the junction of Tolka Valley Road, where she crashed into railings.

She left the vehicle and ran into Tolka Valley Park, in the direction of Ratoath Road.

The victim was taken to James Connolly Memorial Hospital where he was treated for a broken shoulder, ribs, an injury to the pelvis and cuts and grazes.

Gardai later found the accused fighting with another woman in the middle of Cardiffsbridge Road. Murray had cuts and grazes and was identified as the woman who had been driving the car.

She had two previous convictions, but they were for public order offences. Shortly after the accident, Murray had gone to the hospital and apologised to McDonagh.

Murray wept and was comforted by members of her family before being taken into custody.

aphelan@herald.ie


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