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Child porn man sent back to jail for new offences

A man with previous child pornography convictions was sent back to jail today for three years for reoffending.

Barry Watters (35), whose address cannot be published by order of the court, received a four-year jail term, with one year suspended, for possessing child pornography on December 7 last year.

Detective Garda James Neary said Watters was observed by a member of the public at an internet cafe in Dublin where he was seen to be viewing child pornography.

He was reported to the gardai and his apartment in Dublin was searched by gardai and more than 100 pornographic images were discovered on USB sticks, the memory card of a mobile phone and on printed paper.







Images

Garda Neary said the majority of images were cartoon images of Asian children, some of which involved "gross" activities between very young children and adults.

Other images were of actual children.

The detective told the court Watters told gardai he did not think that cartoon images were classed as child pornography.

The detective pointed out that such images are included in the Child Pornography Act.

Defending barrister Jim McCullogh said Watters suffered from compulsive and addictive behaviour and had attended courses to deal with these problems while in prison for a similar offence.

The barrister said that Watters came under very serious pressure from the media when he was released from his earlier prison term and had been publically vilified.

This heavy pressure from the media made it difficult for him to try and settle back into society and he reverted to his addictive behaviour.

But he reoffended and was back before the court which caused a three-year prison term to be activated.







Arrested

He was released from prison in July 2011 but was arrested months later in December on similar charges.

Judge Martin Nolan sentenced him to four years with one year suspended.

The judge acknowledged that Watters was claiming that part of his problem was from the media not accepting his anonymity. But the judge said he himself was "not sure about that matter".

In sentencing him, he said the risk of him reoffending was a real one in view of his past behaviour.

He said society needed to be protected from him in the future and he had to be punished for his crimes.

hnews@herald.ie


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