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Chilling rapist to return to his home area

RAPIST Larry Murphy is planning to live close to the scene of his brutal attack when he is released next month.

The Herald can reveal that the suspected serial killer has attempted to make contact with a family member, who lives near Baltinglass, Co Wicklow.



Now terrified locals say they are “very concerned” over his expected return to the area where he raped



He will be let back into the community despite not having undergone any treatment or rehabilitation while in jail.



He is expected to stay with the family member after his release next month, at a property not far from Murphy’s home village.



The location is near where Larry Murphy brutally raped a businesswoman – an attack which led to him being jailed.



The rapist, who is a suspect in the cases of three missing women, has reportedly given an address in southwest Wicklow to gardai which will be his primary place of residence.



The home on the outskirts of Baltinglass, Co Wicklow, has been modified to accommodate him, it is understood.



CONCERNED



Murphy – the prime suspect in the mysterious cases of Deirdre Jacob, Jo Jo Dullard and Annie McCarrick – will be released on August 13 after serving just 10 years for the horrific abduction and rape of a woman in 2000.



Frightened families in Baltinglass say they are growing “very concerned” about where Murphy will live as next month’s release date looms.



One businesswoman said: “I’m very concerned. It’s too close for comfort. The world knows about it at this stage.”



Another local added: “You can imagine how people are feeling. Where he’s going to be living is obviously going to be of interest to people. It’s important that people know. [We’ll have to] wait and find out.”



On February 11, 2000, Larry Murphy subjected a Carlow businesswoman to a shocking and prolonged sexual assault. He approached the woman and said something to her which she believed was “give me the money”.



He punched her, knocking her to the ground, breaking her nose. He then shoved her into her car and took her keys.



He moved her car 25ft to where he had left his Fiat hatchback car, he made her take off her bra, and bound her hands tight using it.



Murphy flung her into his boot and turned his radio on full blast to drown out her screams.



He drove the car to the isolated area of Kilkea in south Kildare, just six miles from where he lived. He pulled her into the car and began to rape her violently. Murphy demanded that she kiss him during the ordeal. He then tied her up once more, gagged her mouth and drove to a separate location at Spinan's Cross in the Glen of Imaal. There he took his terrified captive from the boot.



“Make love to me,” he said before raping her three times and forcing her to have anal and oral sex.



In prison, he has refused to undergo any sex offenders' rehabilitation programmes. He will not be electronically tagged on release but will be monitored around-the-clock. Murphy has been described as a “loner” by locals, and local women in particular will be tense upon his release.



LONER



“I feel the women are pretty scared. He’s a crafty sort of person and he seems bad. He was definitely guilty anyway. He’s awful sly, a bit of a loner, distant, and you get a bad feeling about him,” said one local.



“It’s worrying, obviously everyone is hoping that he’s not going to be living here. Everyone knew for the last few years that he was getting out,” he added.



“I wouldn’t like to be a girl on a lonely country road and he’d come along on a motorbike,” said another concerned local.



A pensioner added: “We’d be worried, [and wondering] are they going to send him back home or away to England or somewhere, but then they can’t because he’s on the sex offenders’ list.”



One retired woman said: “If we had little grandchildren or something living anywhere close to him we would be concerned.”



“I don’t know what the answer is. They have to live somewhere, he’s done his time, but then with people with children you could understand their worry.”



Another added: “People might [protest], but for all the good that’s going to do. I don’t know how they’ll react.”


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