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Children say cash is the best part of Communion

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FIRST Communion children are more excited about the money they will get on the day than any religious aspect of the event.

Seven in 10 children see the money as the best part of the day while wearing their Communion outfit as the most special memory.

And despite the economic downturn the First Holy Communion remains a lucrative business, with the average cash gift between €20 and €30.

For 15pc of children the day brings them in excess of €150 while another 22pc earn between €90 and €150. Of the rest, 17pc get €50-€70 and the remainder get less than €50.

A survey by giftcard providers One4all found that more than half of all First Communicants remembered putting on their special clothes as the best memory of the day with another 23pc citing visits to relatives as the best memory.

Receiving the Sacrament came third on the list of special moments, with only 15pc of children choosing this as the best part of the day.

Little girls were particularly keen to show off their dress after the event and almost half wore it at least once more, while 40pc wore it up to three times more and 14pc got more than four wears out of their outfit.

One third of adults surveyed still had their Communion dresses, while 14pc had given it to a charity and just 2pc had sold it. Most however – 83pc – are concerned that the day has become an over-the-top affair, particularly in the past decade.

 

MEMORIES

 

ALMOST EIGHT IN 10 ALSO FEEL THAT CHILDREN ARE GIVEN FAR TOO MUCH MONEY ON THE DAY.

The survey involved 300 people between the ages of 18 and 35 who were asked for their memories of their First Communion Day.

As adults 59pc of people still prefer to give money to First Communion children rather than a gift or a giftcard.

Of those giving cash 43pc give between €20-€30 but 4pc give more than €50.

In the case of giftcards just over half give a card worth between €20-€30 but 9pc give in excess of €50. When it comes to buying gifts over 70pc spend under €30 with just 1pc spending more than €50.

See page 17


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