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High tides and waves hit the Clontarf coast in Dublin as the recent stormy weather continues. Picture: Arthur Carron/Collins

High tides and waves hit the Clontarf coast in Dublin as the recent stormy weather continues. Picture: Arthur Carron/Collins

High tides and waves hit the Clontarf coast in Dublin as the recent stormy weather continues. Picture: Arthur Carron/Collins

Dublin was on a major flood alert today as the massive Atlantic swell that hit the west coast this morning was set to rise with the high tide today.

The large sea-surge flooded areas of the west and east as it hit at around 6am, but the effects were not due to be felt on the east until later today.

Met Eireann and local authorities were watching closely, with sandbagging of vulnerable and low-lying areas being carried out over the weekend.

 

"WE HAVE HAD WORSE STORMS IN THE PAST IN TERMS OF WIND, BUT THIS TIME WE HAD HIGH TIDES AS WELL, SO THE CRITICAL FACTOR HERE HAS BEEN THE COMBINATION OF ALL OF THESE WEATHER EVENTS – HIGH WINDS, HEAVY RAIN AND HIGH SEAS ALL TOGETHER," SAID MET EIREANN FORECASTER PAT CLARKE.

"It's all down to a huge storm currently in the middle of the Atlantic which is feeding the high winds, high seas and heavy rain in over Ireland.

"At the moment, it doesn't look like the storm centre will be coming in over Ireland, but it will continue to throw this poor weather in our direction."

Areas including Clontarf, Baldoyle, Portmarnock and Sandymount were most at risk from tide surges today.

In the south, torrential rain and winds gusting to 120kmh caused misery this morning.

Lightning caused power outages across parts of Cork while winds brought down trees and the rainfall combined with a storm surge left dozens of coastal areas and Cork city on high flood alert.

The worst power outages occurred in the Bandon area where lightning strikes left hundreds of homes in darkness overnight.

Flooding hit Bantry with the combination of high tides, a storm surge and torrential rainfall leaving parts of the quays and square under water.

Midleton was also hit, with the Bailick-Ballinacurra Road again closed after drains were swamped by the downpour.

The winds brought down trees in the Youghal, Lisgoold, Fermoy and Bantry areas, with motorists urged to drive with extreme caution.

Cork city centre residents and traders were placed on flood alert for the seventh successive day.

The problem was exacerbated by torrential overnight rainfall which left large quantities of surface water combined with partially filled drains and culverts.

High tide was at 9am, and flooding again hit low-lying quays including Union Quay, Morrisson's Quay and Sharman-Crawford Street.

Irish Ferries warned that all Swift sailings to Wales have been suspended given the stormy seas.

In the west, the promenade in Salthill from Seapoint to Grattan Road was closed at 6.30am due to the heavy spray being blown up on the road with the Salthill car park flooded.

In Spiddal, where most of the promenade was ripped away by earlier storms, two garda patrols alerted motorists to further flooding on the road this morning with debris also on the road.

ESB crews worked to restore power to more than 1,000 homes in counties Mayo and Galway.

Galway City Council warned that there was a risk of flooding at the Spanish Arch, Fishmarket and Docks area.

While the high tide mark came and went without significant flooding, homes and businesses remained on high alert.

A number of ferries sailings were also cancelled due to the winds of up to 120kmh.

The Coast Guard has advised the public to stay away from exposed coasts, cliffs piers, harbour walls and beaches.

hnews@herald.ie

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